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Should I 'notch' trim around a shelf? (pics)

Should I 'notch' trim around a shelf? (pics)

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  #1  
Old 03-11-10, 09:37 AM
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Should I 'notch' trim around a shelf? (pics)

So I just got in the shelf for the kitchen/diningroom passthrough I cut.

http://img58.imageshack.us/img58/6152/img4263.jpg

Unfortunately, I forgot to take into account the size of the trim around the opening as you can see here:

http://img48.imageshack.us/img48/2933/img4265.jpg

So the trim basically goes beyond the shelf by about 5/8" which leaves me with 2 alternatives as I see it, I'd like feedback/opinions or if I'm missing a 3rd alternative?

1. Notch the trim around the shelf
2. Add an extra 3/4" pine or sheetrock (or molding?) to the sides of the opening so that the trim ends flat AT the shelf (no notch needed)

What do you folks thing, have you ever seen notching around a shelf like that, will it look cheap? Thanks a ton in advance!
 
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  #2  
Old 03-11-10, 09:50 AM
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I'm not quite sure what I am looking at here. By shelf I think you mean sill. I also think the sill you are referring to is the solid surface type counter top material?

If that's the case, you can cut the trim out and lay the sill directly underneath it. Use a pull saw or jam saw to do so. (It's a hand held saw that costs maybe $10). If the solid surface material IS the trim, you will have to notch out.

Make it as close as possible, and then just caulk where they meet. It won't even be noticeable
 
  #3  
Old 03-11-10, 10:25 AM
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I would go with option 2. Look at your windows, the trim doesn't get notched around the sill it sits on top of it. That is the look you want to have.
 
  #4  
Old 03-11-10, 10:33 AM
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Yea, I think the notch idea will probably just look strange rather than buying 3/4" pine. So I'll lose 1.5" of total width, but that shouldn't be a big deal.

1. I guess I should also replace the top sheetrock in the opening with pine as well so everything will match properly when painted....?

2. Will a finishing nail gun anchor the pine in place for my purposes (there are studs on the left/right sides of the opening that I framed with)? Or do I need more heavy duty nails/screws?

3. Then just cover the nail/screw holes with painter's putty and paint, right?
 
  #5  
Old 03-11-10, 10:38 AM
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Why even put trim above the solid surface? Why not cornerbead and mud? Then just put a piece of trim underneath as an apron(?).

Or are you like me? Can't mud worth a durn! lol
 
  #6  
Old 03-11-10, 11:09 AM
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Funny, I never heard of corner beading at all until you just mentioned it, never knew the darned things existed. I AM awful at mudding so I'd probably wreak havoc with the corner beads (unless I hire someone to do it). Plus, I think the trim probably just gives it a more pleasing finish, I found this link on the web that shows with trim, doesn't it look nicer? I guess it's all subjective:

http://www.residentialservicesofohio.../kitchen_4.jpg

http://www.inhomehandyman.com/portfo...interiors3.jpg

Here is without trim:

http://getgrounded.files.wordpress.c...90215_0435.jpg

So, unless the wife agrees with you when she gets home, I'll stick with the pine & trim route (but thanks for the tip!)
 
  #7  
Old 03-11-10, 11:37 AM
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I get it now... the shelf/ sill is already in and you are trimming around the opening itself. DUH! I thought trim was in the way if installing the sill...

Ok, then I like the corner bead mudding option as well. Would give you the best look.

as far as mudding, it's not that hard. google or youtube vids on how to mud an outside corner. It's a several step process but it's not hard at all. You can do it with very successful results. The vids make it very easy to comprehend every step and what you may expect and encounter.

Nail or screw the cornerbead in place. Using a 6 inch knife, pull the mud out from the corner all the way around. let dry, sand, repeat with an 8 inch knife.... let dry, sand, and if need be, repeat one last time with a 10 inch knife. easy peasy! Good luck!
 
  #8  
Old 03-11-10, 12:18 PM
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Ok, wife nixed the pine idea, so corner beading it is.

Just watched a bunch of youtube videos on corner beads & mudding them, but they all show it done on unpainted, newly installed sheetrock. Mine is already a finished/painted wall as you can see:

http://img58.imageshack.us/img58/6152/img4263.jpg

Will it be a problem installing the cornerbead on TOP of the painted wall and then mudding over that?

I'm not worried about inside the passthrough where I can mud the entire 4.5" width and paint over all of it, I'm worried about the walls outside of the passthrough where I will only mud about 1/2 the wall, won't there be a "mud line" running down the wall as a result?

Or is it just as fine putting corner bead & mudding it on an already painted/finished wall?

Also....doesn't help that the paint is all semi-gloss....
 
  #9  
Old 03-11-10, 12:35 PM
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Sorry I brought it up...lol. Have to let one of the mudders give you a better answer...but I think you'd need to lightly sand the painted area to get better adhesion.....and the feathering and progressive sanding will blend into the existing. But yeah, you're going to probably need to paint the whole wall to get a good match after.
At least the wall doesn't look like its textured....

You could also look at smaller trim...maybe colonial stop? Not as fancy as what you have...and may not match the existing...but just another option.

Ohhh hey..what about corner molding? Its pretty plain...but when painted it would blend right in....http://www.homedepot.com/Building-Ma...atalogId=10053
 
  #10  
Old 03-11-10, 03:32 PM
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I know it is too late, but you could wrap the entire opening and under the shelf with WM366 case molding, just cutting a square notch out for the profile of the shelf in the two pieces of molding.
But if you like mudding that much, hey
 
  #11  
Old 03-12-10, 04:14 AM
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Chandler- That was my "option 1" in my original post. To put molding around the opening and just cut a notch out for the shelf. I have 1 5/8" colonial molding already in my garage for that purpose. I was debating between that and corner beading. I am actually going to try the notch and see how it looks. If it's fine, I'll leave it and save myself all that corner beading work.

The reason why I am leery of the corner beading in my situation is that I would have to mud on top of semi-gloss paint. I already tried that in a different area and the stuff does not like to stick, so I'd probably have to sand the entire opening on BOTH sides of the wall and even then I'd need to mud perfectly so that it doesn't show, and then repaint everything. So if the notch looks fine to me & wife (i doubt anyone who ever comes over would even notice the molding in the first place. half the people barely realize there's a hole in the wall now), then I'll leave the notch. I'll take pictures when I'm done and repost.
 
  #12  
Old 03-12-10, 05:15 AM
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If you are going the bead route since this isn't an area where people will be smashing in to look at the vinyl beading. It's easier to use if you've never done it before. With the metal the nails can be a slight problem to cover and they can be difficult to get into the stud unless you get the wider version of the metal.
 
  #13  
Old 03-23-10, 06:45 AM
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I went the trim notching route, had my kid's birthday party since then and all the guests loved the passthrough, so I guess that's all that matters. I don't think anyone will ever notice that I notched the trim instead of rested it on the sill (which was too short).

Here are the final pics (well, before I caulked & filled the nail holes...):

http://img710.imageshack.us/img710/2...318img4281.jpg

http://img687.imageshack.us/img687/8...318img4282.jpg

Thanks for the tips/advice.
 
  #14  
Old 03-23-10, 05:16 PM
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There ya go!!!!!!!!!!!.............Good job.
 
  #15  
Old 03-23-10, 05:18 PM
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Yep...looks good!


......2525252525 characters later
 
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