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Difficulty with brad nailer on quarter round

Difficulty with brad nailer on quarter round

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  #1  
Old 03-22-10, 06:14 PM
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Difficulty with brad nailer on quarter round

Hi,

I am finishing up a Pergo Laminate install and am ready to put the quarter round (3/4") on. I purchased a air brad nailer and practiced on a couple pieces and found the nails have a tendency to bend as they pass through the wood and often end up penetrating through the bottom of the moulding instead of straight thru to the baseboard.

I experimented with 18 Guage 1-1/4 and 1" with the shorter nail still curving but obviously less damaging to the flooring. It seems the nails are too thin but all the information I have seen says 18 guage is appropriate. Should I suspect the inexpensive nailer, my low skill level, or the strength of the nail, or all of the above?

Any tips or input would be appreciated.
 
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  #2  
Old 03-22-10, 07:04 PM
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Usually you use base shoe, not quarter round when trimming a floor. Baseshoe has a little more flat area so that you can nail straight back into the base. The baseshoe is usually 1/2" wide, and 3/4" tall. If you position it so that it is 3/4" wide and 1/2" tall, you would create a nailing problem. An 18 ga gun is fine for what you are doing.

You do not want your nails to go into the floor, since pergo is supposed to be a "floating floor", not fastened anywhere. If nails pierce it, it will probably end up buckling as it tries to expand. I believe Pergo is supposed to be kept 1/4" away from baseboards to allow for expansion and contraction.

So if you insist on using quarter round, you will have to try to nail straight back into the base, and avoid hitting the Pergo. This would mean you'd place the air hose straight up in the air, and have the gun oriented straight up and down as you try to nail straight back into the baseboard.
 
  #3  
Old 03-22-10, 07:30 PM
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Thanks for the reply,

I am using the 3/4 tall by 3/4 wide type, so it is more difficult to get the proper angle to direct it into the baseboard. Should I use a 16 guage finish nailer instead? I am concerned that it may split the wood.
 
  #4  
Old 03-22-10, 08:00 PM
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It probably won't split the wood, but it will leave a bigger hole to fill. Did you try using the brad nailer again, with the hose straight up in the air and the front of the gun against the floor?
 
  #5  
Old 03-22-10, 08:21 PM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper View Post
It probably won't split the wood, but it will leave a bigger hole to fill. Did you try using the brad nailer again, with the hose straight up in the air and the front of the gun against the floor?


I will try that method again in the morning. I have been using scrap pieces so far before risking on the real thing and have tried it at many angles, but haven't found a reliable position so far that gives 100% with no damage to laminate.

Thanks for your help, I'll let you know if the upside down method works.
 
  #6  
Old 03-22-10, 10:09 PM
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If the brad is bending it means it is hitting something it can't penetrate and is being bent out of direction instead of penetrating whatever it is hitting.

In this case I would think the pergo floor. What sleeper suggests is what you should be doing, and is quite simple. Don't let the gun intimidate you. the quality of the gun should have no bearing on your success.

the only thing different that would make it easier or more difficult is if the tip of the gun (what you press down on before firing) is metal or tipped in rubber. Some of the less expensive guns are metal and can easily slide off of work before you pul the trigger. Just acclimate yourself to using it and you will be fine.
 
  #7  
Old 03-23-10, 05:31 AM
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What is your air pressure set at?
 
  #8  
Old 03-23-10, 10:08 AM
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Also...if I'm not mistaken..the Pergo 1/4 round is the composite stuff..not real wood....and yes..a 18ga brad nailer might have trouble with it. The composite is very dense and hard.

I would probably be using a finish nailer...esp since its 3/4".
 
  #9  
Old 03-24-10, 02:38 AM
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I believe there are several issues going on. Wood shape, skill, and gun quality. The wood is pine, not too dense, but the angle is a problem. Since there is no flat area any "flush" hit would aim it toward the floor once it penetrates the wood due to the curvature. I will get a better quality gun. Hopefully that will solve it.

Thanks much, I will report back with the results.
 
  #10  
Old 03-28-10, 08:45 PM
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I returned the less expensive nailer and got the Rigid $140 model from home depot that fires 16 guage nails. It didn't leave a gouge on the wood and was able to use it in the inverted position you guys suggested. It didn't always push the nail in all the way so had to follow up with a punch in some circumstances but worked well for the most part.

Once I got the angle right the job went quickly. Thanks for all the tips. Next I'll be tiling the bathroom so I am far from done with the DIY process.
 
  #11  
Old 03-29-10, 04:24 AM
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I believe that's the same nail gun that I bought a year or two ago. I've been well satisfied with mine

There are 3 things that will cause a nail gun not to set the nail; not enough air pressure, gun not held tightly against the trim and hitting a knot ........ but I've painted behind several so called professional carpenters that thought because they had a nail gun, they didn't need to carry a hammer and nail set. Glad you stopped to set the nails that didn't
 
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