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Baseboard Bullnose Base Outside 40 degree Corners


Docfxit's Avatar
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05-16-10, 06:25 PM   #1  
Baseboard Bullnose Base Outside 40 degree Corners

I'm having a hard time figuring out the correct angle to cut the baseboards on an outside corner that is 40 degrees bullnose. I'm using a piece in the middle of the two baseboards that is " on the inside. Can someone please help me determine the correct angle?

Thank you

Docfxit

 
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05-16-10, 07:23 PM   #2  
If you are going around an outside corner that is 40 degrees, and you are using a piece of baseboard to make a transition piece to cover the rounded bullnose corner, you'd put a 10 degree miter on each piece- on each end of the transition piece, and on each piece of baseboard on each side, since 4x10 = 40 degrees.

The length of your transition piece when measured from short point to short point will be a critical length. You will need to play with the exact length until you get a perfect fit. If you put a straight edge on each wall, and measure the gap between them where the back side of your transition will be, that should get you in the ballpark.

If this doesn't work, then either your corner is not really 40 degrees or you need to clarify your situation.

 
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05-16-10, 07:37 PM   #3  
Thank you for the reply.

I figured out 10.5 degrees worked great with a transition piece 5/8".

Evidently this wall must be 42 degrees.

I think I was making it too complicated before.

Thank you very much,

Docfxit


Last edited by Docfxit; 05-16-10 at 08:00 PM.
 
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05-16-10, 07:50 PM   #4  
I might be wrong... this is a heck of a lot easier to DO than to imagine and explain while sitting at a computer... but let me try again.

Most outside corners will be 135 degrees, which would be a 90 + 45.

But if you actually have a 130 degree corner... (90 + 40) then your angles should be 12.5 + 12.5 + 12.5 + 12.5.

If your corner is 135, I think they would be 11.25 + 11.25 + 11.25 + 11.25.

 
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05-17-10, 08:47 AM   #5  
Thanks for the reply.

It's nice of you to try to explain this.

I don't understand how you calculated 12.5. If I take 12.5 * 4 = 50

If I take 11.25 * 4 = 45

Thanks,

Docfxit

 
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05-17-10, 04:40 PM   #6  
Glad to help!

You matched the angle on the wall w/ a sliding t-bevel, then put it on the miter saw. The miter saw read 40 degrees. That does not mean your corner is 40 degrees. It means it is 130 degrees.

When a miter saw is set at zero, it's really cutting a right angle, or a 90. So you add 90+40 and get the angle of the corner... 130 degrees. So you take 180 degrees, minus 130 degrees and you get 50 degrees. This is actually the measurement that you would bisect, if you were doing a two piece miter, but since you are doing a 3 piece miter, you have 4 angles, one on each piece. 50 / 4 = 12.5

 
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