Install 1/4" paneling over drywall

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  #1  
Old 03-17-11, 10:45 AM
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Install 1/4" paneling over drywall

I'm finishing a laundry room in my basement and I want to install 1/4" beadboard paneling over the drywall (floor to ceiling). I think it makes sense to glue the paneling onto the drywall to avoid any bubbles forming. I'm not crazy about using an adhesive since any future changes will need to re-plaster the walls if they remove the paneling. However, I doubt (or I know) that I'll never be changing the wall covering, and I doubt someone will have strong feelings about the laundry room to make a change either.

Any insight on the following?:
1) If using adhesive, do I just need nails in the corners assuming a good stick? I don't mind adding extra nails (I'll be using a finishing nailer) but if I can minimize the nail holes it should look bettter.

2) Is predrilling holes in the corners req'd for 1/4" board?

3) What's the common practice for finishing the butt joints? I haven't looked to see if their is trim made for this, or if it's just as easy to install a caulk filler. I'll just have two vertical joints on each wall (3 boards each wall). I'll probably just add quarter-round in the corners.

4) Could you get by without nailing the edge (adhesive only). I have one wall where the center sheet would have to be cut a couple inches to align the edge with a stud. This would eliminate any cut edges, except for the corners.

I've notice some different suggestions on how-to sites, so I thought I'd run this by a forum. Many times other sites were talking about thicker interlocking paneling, which I don't have. Thanks !
 
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  #2  
Old 03-17-11, 12:25 PM
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#1 - you always need a few nails to hold it in place until the adhesive sets up.

#2 - I wouldn't think so but you should know for sure after 1-2 nails

#3 - usually on bead board, it overlaps hiding the joint. Other types of paneling either get left as is or covered with a thin molding. If you do a good job of fitting the bead board panels - you could just caulk the inside corners, otherwise molding will be fine.

#4 - I'd nail all around the perimeter and a few throughout the panel to secure it good and flat.
 
  #3  
Old 03-21-11, 06:47 AM
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I hope your not planing on using that cheap prefinished bead board paneling!
It's made from ground up cardboard and will fail in no time in a basement. It's not below grade rated. I've seen it fail even in an above ground bathroom.
Use exterier rated real wood paneling or Vinyl. Yes it takes more time because it will need to be sanded, cleaned primed and painted but will hold up forever.
We use Loc Tite brand Qwick Grab adhesive when doing paneling. We apply the adhesive in a tight S shape on the wall and on the back side of the panels around the outside edges about 2" in so it does not squrt out.
Start in the middle of the wall not a corner, the first piece muct be plumb or the rest of the panels will be out, never have the paneling sitting right on the floor (floors are nevel perfectly flat.) The paneling will wick up water if it contacts the floor.
We apply the panel then go over it with a hand floor roller to even out the adhesive.

All seams must be in the middle of a stud.
All cuts in the inside corners should be scribed and cut so there tight to the corner so no inside corner moulding is needed.
Finish nails will never hold up paneling, use a peneumatic narrow crown stapler, or panel nails.
There should only be nails at the seams and at the top and bottom. If you use the Loc Tite I suggested there's no need for nails in the field.
If you apply a bead of 50 year caulking in the inside corners it will hide the seams. There should be no need for anything at the butt joints if you take your time and make sure the joints tight.
 
  #4  
Old 03-22-11, 05:05 PM
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Thanks for the replies.

The paneling I have is probably the cheap stuff you are talking about. It's hardboard material ready-to-paint panels from Georgia Pacific. They are only 1/4" thick (no overlap at joints). Now you got me worried. I remember that the panels were rated for dry basements etc, but I'll check into this.

I have some base cabinets and a wall cabinet for the room. What's the common practice for a new room with regards to installing new cabinets with paneling? Paneling covering all drywall surfaces (behind cabinets)? ...or cabinets over drywall and install paneling around cabinets and countertops??
 
  #5  
Old 03-23-11, 03:41 AM
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It's easier to install the paneling first that way you don't have to worry about making perfect cuts to fit the paneling up to the cabinets.
 
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