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Crown vs Baseboard/Window Molding


projectmaster's Avatar
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03-21-11, 06:40 AM   #1  
Crown vs Baseboard/Window Molding

I have eggshell style molding on the baseboard and around the windows/doors in my dining room. I would like to put crown molding around the ceiling. Do I need to change the baseboard/window molding to match so it doesn't look weird, or is it acceptable to have eggshell on the floor and crown on the ceiling?

Thanks

 
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03-21-11, 06:59 AM   #2  
Since there's no such thing as egg shell moulding I'd guess your talking about Ranch, also called clam shell style mounding.
If your going to keep the old dated moulding then install a simple plain style crown moulding.
If you want to up date the whole house and make it look 100% better change out that old moulding to at least Roman Ogee style baseboards and Coloneal stye casing.
Many times when a realitor has trouble trying to sell a home We have gone in and did nothing more then get rid of that old style moulding and the house sold soon after.
If you have never installed crown before it's one of the trickest jobs a DIY can do.
Home Depot now carrys a crown moulding that has the same profile so it does not have to be cut up side down to have it come out right.
Another tool that you can buy at Lowes is the Bench Dog Crown-Cut - Rockler Woodworking Tools
It makes cutting any crown super easy to do.
It's also best to use a pneumatic finish nailer when installing it with 3" long finish nails.
Trying to do it by hand will leave hammer marks and move every time you hit it.

 
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03-21-11, 07:09 AM   #3  
yes, i meant clam shell, thanks. i'll look into the cost of doing it all. i have a week of paternity coming up, need to keep myself occupied!

 
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03-21-11, 07:16 AM   #4  
If your going to be doing trim work your going to need a Compound mitre saw also.
With most crowns your going to need a 12" one.The cheapest one that works well is the Ryobi brand. I've got one that I bought over 10 years ago that we still use all the time on job sites. It's getting worn out now, but it's built a bunch of garages, houses, addition, not just around the house use.

 
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03-21-11, 01:46 PM   #5  
A good compound miter saw will have detents set for crown molding where you can load your wood flat against the base and up against the fence to cut. No more upside down and backwards. I use a Ridgid offset motor 12" on jobsites, which allow you to cut 5 1/2" base standing up without hitting your motor. My Bosch 12" is relegated to the shop, now. You may want to consider upgrading to the Colonial, which is very elegant, or rosettes, plinthblocks and fluted molding. Anything you can do to change trim will help the house 100% as Joe said.

 
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03-22-11, 08:28 AM   #6  
thanks. i have a rigid 12" miter.
since i have your ear though, let me ask: thoughts on the 'block's at the corners instead of mitering? for example:

Amazon.com: House of Fara ICR6P Inside Corner Blocks: Geroy's

 
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03-22-11, 11:31 AM   #7  
For crown it is a perfectly good way to do it. It eliminates the 30.6 and 31 degree miter/bevel angle you will have to master for the corners. Some pros don't like them as it doesn't show their angle cutting prowess, but, hey, it you like it, who is to say you can't do it. On top of that, those blocks would look well with the rosette/plinthblock/fluted molding I suggested. Go for it.

 
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