Want to stain existing moldings

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  #1  
Old 11-28-11, 12:09 PM
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Want to stain existing moldings

I just had my oak floors stain red oak and they look really good!!! Now all the molding around the windows and doors and so on I want to match or come close to matching. All the molding is stained already with a clear I think. I already lightly sanded them all with 180 grit. Im not sanding them all down to bar wood. that would take me months to do. What can I do instead? I was looking at minwax PolyShades. Do I just add two coats and be done or im Im going to have cold and hot spots? Some spots I had to sand all the way to the wood so what do I do?

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  #2  
Old 11-28-11, 12:20 PM
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I would either strip them to bare wood or only refresh them by applying a new coat of poly or two - it's been my experience tinted poly is more work than stripping and starting over (note: I mean chemical stripper to get to bare wood, not sanding).

At 180 grit, you've already sanded enough to put on a coat of poly.
 
  #3  
Old 11-28-11, 12:39 PM
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Well strip will not work to good either because I have anderson windows that are wood too. and they need stain on the sills and I was going to stain them too. this is what it looks like now.



What dose everbody thing?
 
  #4  
Old 11-28-11, 01:25 PM
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I don't understand - if you need to stain windows, strip the trim and stain everything.
 
  #5  
Old 11-28-11, 01:47 PM
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If you mean staining in place...I'd never do it. Much harder than working on a flat horizontal surface.

I know you've already sanded...but personally I like the contrast between the wood floor and the lighter trim. The doors would need to be darker to look good....but the trim is a nice accent to the richer color of the floors.

Never used the polyshades, but I hear its pretty hard to get good results sometimes.
 
  #6  
Old 11-29-11, 04:19 AM
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If you've sanded thru the existing poly/varnish - I wouldn't use polyshades! Tinted poly can be troublesome to apply. Raw spots in the wood will suck up more color, any runs, drips, lap marks, etc will have more color. Missed spots will have less. Tinted polys can't be touched up or over brushed and it's difficult [sometimes impossible] to do any kind of touch up. When using a tinted poly it's always best to finish with a coat of clear poly to protect the color from wearing off.

Tinted poly doesn't require stripping the existing finish although a light sanding is always beneficial. To restain the wood it must be stripped [chemically] and sanded down to bare wood. I agree with Vic that the contrast between the floor and trim looks good.
 
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Old 11-29-11, 05:29 AM
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ok on the pol/ I was doing some more reading on it last night and read that. Minwax says to add Pre-Stain Wood Conditioner before PolyShades. but its getting into a lot of work now. I had to sand all the molding it was so bad, scratched, drips running down the molding, window sills where all black from acs sitting on them. So sanding was a must. my problem is I do not think the moldings are a clear. the doors are. thats why there ligter.
 
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Old 11-29-11, 05:48 AM
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The pre conditioner is for raw wood. It helps soft woods like pine to accept the stain more evenly. IMO it is never a good idea to use a tinted poly over raw wood!

If you take a wet thinner rag and wipe down the sanded wood work, while the wood is still wet with the thinner - that will give you an idea of how the wood will look with another coat of clear poly.

It would be odd for your woodwork to be stained and the doors not. The doors in the pic appear to me to be stained. Often the wood doors aren't the same species as the wood trim so they will stain differently Birch doors will often stain lighter than the trim, luan doors are often darker than the trim even before the stain is applied.

Often scraping or cutting [carefully] off the drips/runs is better than trying to sand them away. If you cut/scrape off the majority of the run - then it doesn't take as much sanding and you are less likely to sand thru the stain.
 
  #9  
Old 11-29-11, 12:32 PM
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The doors are stained.

ok did not think of that.

This is what all the trim looks like you can see the spots where its bare wood.
 
  #10  
Old 11-29-11, 02:54 PM
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I'm not convinced that is raw wood. Have you wiped it with some paint thinner to see what it looks like wet?

A fresh coat of poly/varnish might be sufficient, if not you can probably wipe on and then off some stain just on those spots..... and then apply your poly.
 
  #11  
Old 12-01-11, 05:22 AM
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Not Yep. Going to do that this weekend I want to see it in the light.

ok

Is there any other brands out there that has a product that works better then minwax poly shades?

The wife wants it to match the floors. I told her everything is not going to be perfectly match eatch other.
 
  #12  
Old 12-01-11, 05:34 AM
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Minwax's PolyShades are the only stock tinted polys I'm aware of. Most paint stores can custom tint poly for you. I usually only use small amounts of tinted poly so I'll generally tint my own. Basically all tinted polys act the same, I doubt that one would be better or work easier than another although the less tint that is added to the poly, the easier it would be to apply.

It would be best to spray the tinted poly on the doors. It might be difficult to color the door using a brush without getting lap marks. You could roll the doors and as soon as you have it rolled, tip off the poly with a brush. Basically that means to use the tips of the brush to lightly brush over the rolled on poly to get rid of the roller stipple.
 
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Old 12-01-11, 07:00 AM
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Ok thanks for the tip. Well What I was going to do it brush it on and then where it laps wipe it with a rag to make it even. Can I do that with this stuff?
 
  #14  
Old 12-01-11, 09:08 AM
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No, tinted poly is the same consistency as regular poly. It is not a stain! If you tried to wipe it with a rag you would just have a gooey mess
 
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Old 12-01-11, 09:26 AM
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You also need to reset your wife's expectations - you're not going to get everything to match no matter what you do, she needs to understand even different parts of the same board often don't look the same after staining. Wood just has too many variables in it - especially when you throw in different species - for matching to be a reasonable expectation.
 
  #16  
Old 12-02-11, 04:51 AM
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Ok good to know.

yes I have told her it will not match 100%. I told her if it was a bare pine door it still could be off just on the door. thats how pine is.

instead of a brush how about a foam brush? Would that work better so I do not see brush lines from the brush?
 
  #17  
Old 12-02-11, 05:30 AM
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I don't use foam brushes, hopefully someone else can answer that for you
 
  #18  
Old 12-02-11, 05:36 AM
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Foam brushes don't work well on anything except a flat wide surface...or for little touch-up "dabs" on walls or ceilings. I keep a selection of them (mostly small) for touch ups on corners or nail holes, etc. Not worth the time to clean out a brush. When done, I just throw the foamies away.

I've used wide foam brushes when I was putting a finish on a shelf board...but thats about it. They act too much like a sponge and hold the material in the pores...then you push harder to get some finish and it puddles and runs.

Might work on a door if you take the door off and lay it flat.
 
  #19  
Old 12-07-11, 08:51 AM
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ok thanks.

I have been testing and the chestnut match really close. But with only one coat. If I use one coat of polyshade. I should put on a coat of clear poly on top of it? If yes will it make the polyshade color darker?
 
  #20  
Old 12-07-11, 08:58 AM
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The clear poly shouldn't change the color on the door any. The reason I recommend using a clear poly over the tinted poly is as the tinted poly wears, the color wears off too. The clear coat helps to protect the tinted poly so it can look good, longer
 
  #21  
Old 12-07-11, 09:36 AM
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ok thanks, so if i seal it with a clear poly it will not wear off?
 
  #22  
Old 12-07-11, 11:53 AM
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It can still wear off, it just takes a lot more wear for that to happen.
 
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