quarter rounds

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  #1  
Old 01-15-01, 11:12 AM
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i recently installed hardwood flooring. i now need to install quarter rounds to cover the gap between the new floor and the baseboards. My problem is that the area is slightly rounded and i don't know how i can curve the quarter round or is there something else i can do?
 
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  #2  
Old 01-18-01, 03:50 PM
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What is it that is "slightly rounded" and how much is "slightly"?
 
  #3  
Old 01-18-01, 06:04 PM
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the wall is slightly rounded, approximatley 4 feet. the wall is curved in a semi-circulare shape.
Where the hard wood floor meets the wall there is a gap of approx 1/4 inch which the quarter round will fill.
How can I make the quarter round meet the curved wall flushly.
Your help is muchly appreciated.
-Bert
 
  #4  
Old 01-18-01, 07:37 PM
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OK, we are getting closer to being on the same channel. Tell me the straight line measurement from where you want to start the 1/4 round to where you want to finish it. In other words, draw a straight line across this ), top to bottom and tell me that measurement. Then, tell me the measurement from the middle of this straight line to the middle of the curve. Is this is what is 4'?

As a hypothetical, if it were a perfect half circle with a 14' diameter, 14' would be the first measurement I asked for, and 7' would be the second? Get it?

Also what size 1/4 round are you using, I am assuming 1/2", and how long are the longest pieces?
 
  #5  
Old 01-21-01, 05:38 AM
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I have measured the straight line which is 68 inches. the measurement from the middle of this line to the middle of the curve is 12 inches.
Have not bought the quarter round for this area yet, could use either.
Any suggestions?
Thanks for your help!
 
  #6  
Old 01-21-01, 12:09 PM
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Based on your measurements, and my rough calculations, the total length of the 1/4 round you need is a fraction over 80 inches (80.095"). Having said that, I would expect a piece of half inch quarter round that is approximately 80 inches long, should flex enough, to fit the curve of your wall.

I'd double check my calculations, by taking a field measurement of the actual run length along the wall. When you cut the 1/4 round, cut it a little bit long (you can't add wood), and put it in place on the floor, with both ends close to where they need to be. Start pushing it in, towards the center of the wall, in the middle. If you can touch the wall in the middle, you are home free. If you cannot touch the wall, turn the corner round completely around (swap ends) and try again. After you cut it to the right length, start your nailing in the middle and work to both ends.

If it will not touch the wall in the center, post back and I'll tell you how to do it in stages.

 
  #7  
Old 01-21-01, 06:18 PM
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Thanks Rick,
I will try and let you know how I make out.
 
  #8  
Old 01-22-01, 05:26 AM
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Rick,
I tried, would not meet in the centre. The quarter round snapped into 2 pieces.
What should I do now?
 
  #9  
Old 01-22-01, 12:41 PM
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Did you try flipping the quarter round end-to-end? Well, it does not matter now.

First, when you buy the next piece of quarter round, you need to be somewhat selective. What you want to do is look at the end of the quarter round to find a piece that has the end-grain parallel with one of the flat sides. Let me know if you understand that concept. If you look at the lines of the grain, they need to run up and down or side-to-side along one of the flat edges. When you install it, the grain has to be aligned with the wall, in other words, if you were to look at it from and end, you'd see the lines of the grain like vertical lines, NOT horizontal lines.

Now, assuming you've gotten the concept, and have purchased a good piece, you have to "force warp" it. There are a couple of ways to do this, but the easiest might be to set it on the floor with the grain aligned vertically, and GENTLY push the center towards the curved wall (both ends should be touching the wall). Remember reading GENTLY, maybe move it towards the wall about 3 inches. Find something to hold it in place (like a gallon jug full of water) and let it set there for a day. IT IS VERY IMPORTANT THAT YOU HAVE THE GRAIN ALIGNED CORRECTLY, AS IT WILL BE INSTALLED AGAINST THE WALL! After 24 hours, move it another half inch or inch, depending on how much resistance you feel. Don't overstress it and break it, take your time. Humidity helps with the stress warping, so if you have a humidifier, set it up in the room and let it run. It may take several days to stress warp it enough to fit the curvature of the room, but it will eventually bend.

This would take 2 minutes to show you how to do, but is difficult to describe in a one-way conversation, so if there is something you don't understand, post back. Grain selection and grain alignment are critical, as is, taking your time.

One final thought, if you are sure the gap you are trying to cover is max 1/4", you might want to consider 3/8" quarter round (if you can find it) instead of 1/2", cause it will bend easier.

Let us know what happens.
 
  #10  
Old 01-22-01, 12:46 PM
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One other caution, after all of the work to get the quarter round to fit the curvature of the wall, don't try to use 8d finish nails to attach it! I'd go with 3d finish nails, and pre-drill the nails.
 
  #11  
Old 01-25-01, 06:54 PM
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Rick:

Thanks for posting a well thought out explanation of a technique (Stress warping) I use from time to time in my shop.

It strikes me as being the best DIY solution to the problem



 
  #12  
Old 01-25-01, 08:19 PM
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George,

I really appreciate your feedback. I know it works, but it sure ain't easy to explain to someone on a forum board!

Would like to know if Bert was successful, but perhaps we'll never know!

Thanks again,

Rick
 
  #13  
Old 02-01-01, 06:04 PM
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Rick,

I am in the process of trying to stress warp the quarter round.
Will let you know how it turns out. So far so Good!
 
  #14  
Old 08-03-10, 05:25 PM
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I was having the same problem, and found the easy solution was to purchase a composite piece of quarter round at our local Home Depot. It is Alexandria PVC and works like a dream.

Hope this helps.

Mike
 
  #15  
Old 08-10-10, 06:28 PM
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bending wooden mouldings

Hi there,
I do a lot of decorative mouldings installation and deal with that problem (challenge) many times. First of all if its a little piece (because its pricey) ask for in lumber yards for same moulding but made of special rubber composite that you can bend any direction then problem easily solved if with any reason you'd rather stay with wooden one then take the moulding and notch (do the cuts vertically) on the back of the moulding lets say every 0.5" one cut (depth of notches 1/4-1/2 thickness of the moulding). Now its going to be bendable lot more. The gaps in the material visible from the top after you nail it you can cover with painters caulk and done. Elasticity of the moulding will depend on how often you will do the cuts on the back.
 

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