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Installing beadboard panelling as wainscotting

Installing beadboard panelling as wainscotting


  #1  
Old 08-01-13, 07:57 PM
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Installing beadboard panelling as wainscotting

Hello,

I am renovating my bathroom in an old century home and am using 4' x 8' sheets of beadboard panelling for the wainscotting. The walls of the bathroom have been gyprocked and primed. I am ready to install the beadboard. It is my intention to cut the panelling into 4' x 4' sheets ~ as the wainscotting is going to be 48 inches up from the floor (give or take for levelling). It is my intention to install the panelling with the factory edge at the top; the top will be covered with chair rail, the bottom will be covered with baseboard. It is my thought that the best way to install the panelling is to apply PLP Premium adhesive to the back of the beadboard and then afix with a nail gun or finish nails.

The design of the panelling is a series of vertical strips ~ 2" wide followed by 3/8 wide, 2", 3/8", 2", 3/8", etc, etc, etc. You get the idea......

My question is two-fold: a) Where do I put the first sheet of beadboard and b) what do I do at the seams and corners? The walls of my bathroom are approximately 6 feet long (not exact). I want the width of the corner "strip" to be exactly 2". That is, if one board ends, say, 1.5" into a 2" strip, I want to cut the adjacent board so there is 0.5" of a strip butting up against it so that, to the eye, the pattern of 2, 3/8, 2, 3/8, 2, 3/8, etc, etc. is not interrupted. [Of course, if you see 1.5" of a strip at the end of one wall, that strip of beadboard is ACTUALLY wider than that (for example, it would be 1.75" if the beadboard butting up against it is 1/4" thick).

So..... to make the cleanest cuts (I'm really, really novice at renovating), should I use a table saw or a skil saw with a guide? Should I pick one corner to start at a factory edge ~ thereby making all other corners at variable positions of the vertical strips OR should I find the middle of each wall and centre a full sheet on each, thereby making all corner the same appearance? (The second choice would seem like a far more professional, consistent approach ~ just more work, more seams, more waste.) Maybe there is another way I haven't thought of?

I hope I have asked my question well; I think it seems kind of confusing but I'm thinking if anyone out there actually knows what I'm talking about then you know what you are doing (if you know what I mean).

Thank you very kindly for any input you have to offer!
Karen
 
  #2  
Old 08-02-13, 02:51 AM
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Karen, I think you have asked your question well. In an older house, as you know, nothing is plumb and nothing is square. Trying to get the paneling to land on even spacing at the corners will virtually impossible. Since the space is so small, you will only be using 2 half sheets per wall. Where the panels meet, a factory edge will dictate how it will land. If you keep your orientation (factory up) then the edges will meet perfectly.

In the corners, you won't have that option as you will be left with a wall that isn't near plumb. Plan on using your first (let's say left) panel, measure 3' 10' out on the wall at the top. What is the measurement at the bottom? That will be the angle you will need to cut the left side of the panel at. You will have to do the same on the other 4' panel, allowing the factory edges to meet and your angle cut to fall into the corners.

A table saw is nice, but since you are cutting odd angles, I wouldn't use one. A circular saw would be the best tool to use. Don't use a guide as your cut won't be square to the panel.
 
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Old 08-02-13, 04:41 AM
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If you need to use a guide - clamp a straight edge to the panel. You can adjust it for the angle needed. Keep in mind that most skil saws have 1.5" between the side of the plate and the blade.
 
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Old 08-02-13, 04:58 AM
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Oh right, I forgot about the issue of plumb-ness. Very astute!! So none of the corners can be perfectly the same width at the top and bottom anyway. Right!!! Very good explanation, thank you most kindly!

And thank you for the validation on my questioning. =)
Karen
 
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Old 08-02-13, 06:08 AM
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Don't worry that you need to keep the factory edge side up. Use a piece of cap molding or your chair rail to hide the cut edge. If you take a 4x8 sheet, cut it in half and orientate it so both factory edges are up. One sheet will have the factory overlap edge in the opposite orientation of what you need. The factory overlap edge needs to stay on the same side for both pieces. One panel will have a cut edge up and one a factory edge up.

I would get the corners as best you can and then cover with a piece of inside corner cove molding. It will hide all the cut edges and give you a more finished look. Any walls that are really out of plumb can be shimmed to straighten out.
 
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Old 08-02-13, 05:33 PM
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Z is right on the orientation. All the "a" edges must meet "b" edges so each half piece will have a factory side up and the next will be the other half and will be selvedge side up. I don't particularly like molding in the corner, but sometimes you can't help it. This bathroom had convoluted walls with 6 corners.

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Old 08-02-13, 06:26 PM
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Oh, I'm so glad you mentioned about the orientation ("a" edges meeting "b" edges). I missed that all together!

And the idea about shimming for plumbness is inspired! I'll determine that once I see how out of plumb they actually are.

One last little thing.... I am putting down my tile underlay as we speak. Which goes on first ~ the wainscotting or the stone tile? Or does it matter?

Cheers everyone and thank you for all of your wise and helpful comments!
Happy renos!
Karen
 
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Old 08-03-13, 03:02 AM
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Wainscoting after tile is finished for sure.
 
 

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