Waterproof paneling?


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Old 01-19-15, 05:01 PM
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Waterproof paneling?

I've got a laundry tub in my boiler room and am looking for waterproof paneling for the adjacent wall to protect from splashes. I would prefer not to get the tile board as it is mdf.

Is there a waterproof paneling mad out of something like pvc? I saw a company from Belgium made something but I'm not sure what is available in the usa.

Thanks!
 
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Old 01-19-15, 05:50 PM
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Do a search for FRP panels. Different colors and textures are available. They might appear a little commercial or industrial, but it's a laundry tub in a mechanical room right?

I used it in my laundry room re-do and they work great. Need the right fasteners, adhesive and trim, but mine turned out darn nice I think.
 
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Old 01-19-15, 06:04 PM
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Thanks GunGuy - that is exactly what I need. Do they carry these at the big box stores? Any advice on installing?

I just put sheetrock on that wall - do I need to tape and spackle or will the panel cover imperfections?
 
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Old 01-19-15, 06:21 PM
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Any Lowes or HD has it.
I've just been using Loc-Tite power grab for paneling and a hand floor roller to press it to the wall and never had one come loose.
There sell Tee strips but it's a royal pain to work with.
 
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Old 01-19-15, 06:58 PM
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Unfortunately the wall is 5' x 7' so I think I will have to do a joint. Thanks for the tips - I'll check them out this week.
 
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Old 01-19-15, 07:59 PM
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Actually, I just used the drive in plastic rivets they make for these panels similar to what you see on cars. A bag is only a couple of bucks IF they have them. Like I said, a little industrial looking. But a heck of a lot easier to repair/replace down the road.

When I did my laundry, I installed the FRP first, then the countertop and laundry tub so the FRP was sandwiched against the sheetrock, then a bead of caulk and some edge trim cut to look nice all around the edge.

Been there 7 yrs...no buckling or waviness.
 
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Old 01-20-15, 06:18 PM
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Well I'm back from two Home Depots who only had one banged up white sheet yet. Lowes had them but I didn't care for the pattern. Tomorrow I'll check some other HDs.

They did have the rivets but they won't really work in my situation so I got the FRP adhesive. It seems that you are supposed to trowel this stuff on - not a perimiter and an X in the middle.

Can anyone offer advice on using the adheasive? I'm thinking I may have to tape the drywall joint so I don't have a dip in the FRP.
 
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Old 01-20-15, 07:10 PM
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Oh yeah..the wall behind needs to be done as if it were being finished with paint. Can't skimp there.

Like I said (I think?)...most places only carry the pebbled commercial stuff. And of course the powers that be don't order stuff if it doesn't sell. I really don't know of any other sort of supplier but you might look on the FRP manufacturers sites to see if they have distributors in your area that can help you out.

Unfortunately, because of the normal commercial usage, there may not be many options. Does a restaurant care about how their kitchen or prep area looks?
 
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Old 01-20-15, 07:53 PM
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Oh the HD pebble stuff was fine, just that there were two sheets between the two that had lots of damage. The Lowes one looked more like a popcorn ceiling so me and the gf didn't care for it.

Ok so I'll finish the wall (dang it!) and it looks like I'll have to trowel on the glue. I'm gonna have one joint as the wall is 5x7 so I figure I'll do a vertical 1' strip towards the corner and use the full 4x8 sheet in the part that shows more.
 
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Old 01-21-15, 05:46 PM
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Well I picked up the two sheets tonight. My poor SUV interior got scratched in a few places....grrrr. I swear if you use the edge of this stuff you can remove tile grout.

This is definitely a two person job. The large sheets are so unruly and flaccid it's hard not to destroy everything in your path.

I have a 1/4" x 3/16" v-notch trowel and the adhesive. Going to see if I can find the FRP roller. And I guess I'll need a special blade for my circular saw.

Including the 24 hr acclimation and expansion space required this stuff looks like a pita to install. Hopefully it will be worth it as I am now thinking some semi-gloss paint would have been a better option. Oh well, in for a penny....
 
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Old 01-21-15, 10:42 PM
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You shouldn't need a saw normally if you have a large enough work surface or even a piece of plywood on the floor. It's more of a score and snap deal. Yeah, it's a lot harder than sheetrock, but a few passes using a sharp knife, good technique, and good straightedge as a guide, then slide a 2x4 under and viola! At least thats what I did.

There may be other instructions on the manufacturers website so I would check there first.

I only used one panel and cut out what I needed for between the counter top and cabinets. Still have 1/2 sheet around here somewhere. I did help install some in a bar I used to go to and they were larger sections, but not full panels and we did same cutting method but used adhesive instead of the rivets since it was going on a block wall.

You are right though, the edges will act like grinder if you aren't careful. You can smooth the edges somewhat with a sanding block, but I liked using the plastic edging material better.
 
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Old 01-22-15, 11:17 AM
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Don't think that there is such a thing as a FRP roller, the trowel will be your best bet. You need to work at a speed that prevents the adhesive from skimming over before you can get it on the wall. May be best to spread the adhesive on the panel itself, while it is on the floor upside down and then hang it on the wall. Don't press it all the way into place until you have adjusted it to where you need it to be. The total friction of the glue will make it hard to lift once you press it in.

Scribe a perfectly vertical line on the wall as your guide to line it up. Cut it a little shy of the floor so you've got some wiggle room. Then add your "H" transition strip and use that as your guide to put in the second piece. Of course, dry fit everything first before applying any adhesive.

It's been too long since I worked with the stuff (updated a restaurant kitchen) that I can not remember what blade I used in my circular saw. Seems to me it was a small tooth plywood type blade, but I'm just grabbing at thin air on that one. My helper did all the cutting, I did all the measureing and hanging.
 
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Old 01-22-15, 11:45 AM
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Thanks for the tips. The Liquid Nails FRP adheasive says it has a working time of 45 minutes so hopefully that is accurate.

The room it is going in is so small I will barely be able to fit the sheet in so I've got to think of how to transport it with the glue from an adjacent room. Haven't figured that out yet.

The "FRP" rollers seem to be vinyl flooring rollers but I'll use a rubber grout float if you think that's best.

Sure hope it is worth it...
 
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Old 01-22-15, 12:02 PM
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My error, I thought you were trying to roll on the FRP adhesive. You probably won't need to purchase a separate roller for the small area you are working, just make sure you stick the whole sheet well. The grout float will help you get a bigger footprint to push on the paneling.

I also envisioned a larger room. May then be best to trowel directly onto the wall. Just be careful not to get adhesive all over the place as it is fairly aggressive to get off the front side of the panel.
 
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Old 01-22-15, 12:18 PM
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All the instructions I have seen say to put it on the panel. Will it cause issues to do it on the wall? I could always tape the edges of the panel to protect them. I have to think there is a reason because putting it on the wall seems much easier in any situation.

I think I'm going to do a test with a scrap piece of FRP and drywall and see how that works.
 
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Old 01-22-15, 01:12 PM
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If the wall is porous, it may make the adhesive dry out too fast as it sucks the moisture out. Refer back to the don't let it skim over comment of earlier. It just is easier to work on a flat surface as opposed to a vertical one where everything wants to droop and end up on the floor. BTW, make sure you protect the floor well.
 
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Old 01-22-15, 04:15 PM
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Good points. It's drywall but will have a taped joint and spackle over the screw holes which would be porous.
 
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Old 01-23-15, 03:24 AM
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I've never installed any FRP panels but some adhesives require that the substrate be sealed first.
 
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Old 01-31-15, 03:18 PM
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Well the install, surprisingly, turned out pretty well. I ended up putting the sheets on my living room floor and put the FRP glue then moved them into the room. A little messy but effective. I also ended up cutting them with a circular saw and masonry blade.

Oh, the adheasive has to be put on a porous surface, not finished. Thanks for all the help!

The weights are there until the silicone sets up on the molding.





[

 
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Old 02-01-15, 05:45 AM
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Nice job good clean install. Are you getting creative on how to use the almost full sheet you have leftover? Hate it when the math doesn't work out and you have a ton of leftovers. Anyway, congrats. you earned a cold one.
 
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Old 02-01-15, 06:01 AM
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I agree, nice job! I have seen guys install this stuff in commercial kitchens and yeah, does not look like a fun job. FRP adhesive looks messy but cleans up with water.
 
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Old 02-01-15, 06:04 AM
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I agree...looks good. I think you'll be very happy with how it cleans up and such. Pretty tuff stuff.

Hey, I still have about 3/4 of a sheet if you need it...lol.
 
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Old 02-01-15, 07:16 AM
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Thanks guys! I almost was able to use one sheet as I had 1' in height left over from the first one and was going to do the 5" strip in two pieces with a joint in the middle. Unfortunately I screwed up the cut so had to go to the second sheet. All in all it worked out nicer since I don't have the joint on the strip.

I'm open to suggestions for my leftover as right now it's holding up the wall in my garage . Even throwing it out is a pain because I would have to cut it up.
 
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Old 02-01-15, 08:14 AM
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If you just want to get rid of it, put it on craigslist in the free section.
 
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Old 02-01-15, 08:22 AM
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Good idea. If I can't think of a use I'll do that.
 
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Old 02-01-15, 09:02 AM
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Use it as a cheap on the go drop cloth for when you want to protect the garage floor from spills from staining or other projects. Drop it down, set up horses, and do your thing, when done, turn it around and slide it in the corner.
 
 

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