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Using the same moulding for baseboard and trim

Using the same moulding for baseboard and trim


  #1  
Old 03-15-15, 12:49 PM
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Using the same moulding for baseboard and trim

I've found this nice moulding that I think would look contemporary and modern to use as both baseboard and door casing. It's 4 1/4 inches wide.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]48022[/ATTACH]

The plan is to use a miter cut so the baseboard flows into the door casing. I know this is unusual but I saw a few examples online (of other mouldings) and I think it looks good (see below). Any thoughts? Problems?

[ATTACH=CONFIG]48023[/ATTACH]
 
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  #2  
Old 03-15-15, 01:13 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

Can't say I've seen this in action but I don't see any issues giving it a go.
 
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Old 03-15-15, 02:36 PM
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Might be fine for casing but no way would I use it for base.
#1, It's to narrow.
#2, A flat top like that would be a dust trap.
#3, Far harder to clean.
 
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Old 03-15-15, 02:48 PM
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#2 and #3 are correct but acceptable. Seems like a lot of modern styles have this ledge but nothing a vacuum can't care of. On the upside, it will be a lot easier to tape off for painting.

On #1, isn't 4 1/4 inches big enough? The standard baseboard/casing I have now is 2 1/4 inches.
 
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Old 03-15-15, 03:00 PM
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I don't like it personally. I've never liked door and window trim the same as the base. The door/window is already prominent enough, wide molding just makes it stand out even more. Maybe using plinth blocks it would look better. Or if the door was 8 ft tall and 8 ft wide, it would work.

Also not a fan of the flat top...most base is slightly tapered at the top somehow. Whether an ogee or a gradual taper.

At the minimum I'd add some sort of bead or cap to the base.
 
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Old 03-15-15, 03:00 PM
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The standard baseboard/casing I have now is 2 1/4 inches.
That sounds like door trim. Idiot contractors here use wedge trim for doors as base board to save money. Try to to install shoe molding and you don't have a flat perpendicular surface for the shoe molding. Could you put shoe molding against the profile you show? Looks like you couldn't because though you have a perpendicular surface the top would be above the flat area on the bottom.
 
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Old 03-15-15, 03:46 PM
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That profile is a casing profile not a base profile, so in that respect it's wrong to use it for both. People who know trim and who know carpentry and who know design would take one look at it and think of it in that manner. It would be just as wrong as nailing up a baseboard profile around a door or window instead of using a casing profile. But whatever floats your boat. It's your house.

From a design aspect, it's proportionately wrong to have equal sizes of base and trim. Base should almost always be of greater width than the casing. I have also never, ever seen a miter at the base of the door casing. That is ALWAYS a butt joint.
 
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Old 03-15-15, 04:20 PM
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A lot of opinions, I agree with them all. The only miters should be at top of door and window openings. Also base should be different than casing. This is where you want to "show off" your skills a little and make it all tight.

I replied though because of the taping for paint. With a little practice I think you will find cutting in gives much better results than taping. You can get some tips here on how to cut in neatly.
 
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Old 03-15-15, 05:12 PM
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Thanks for all the opinions. Contemporary and modern baseboard and casing themes I have seen all seem to go against the traditional grain. I would like something different but still attractive.

I was more concerned with the mitre cut at the base of a door having any issues over time like separating because of door use. It would seem to be similar with a baseboard joining a stair tread, i.e 90 degrees before angling to the stairs, so I hope there shouldn't be any.
 
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Old 03-15-15, 05:21 PM
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If you're concerned with separating, which is a real issue.
Look into trim head screws. The screws have a very small head and will sink like a nail.

Screw (with pilot hole) and glue the mitered corners. Real wood is the way I would go, but much more costly.
 
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Old 03-16-15, 04:01 AM
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I'll add my 2¢

I also don't like base being the same size as the casing [base should be taller] and especially don't care for the look of the miter at the bottom of the casing [and would expect the miter to open up between paint jobs] IMO the base should compliment the casing, not match it.

While I think taller base looks nicer, I've painted a LOT of houses that had 2" base.

But as X said, it's your house and all you have to do is please you and yours .... unless you expect to put it up for sale
 
 

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