Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

baseboard on curved wall?


L.Young's Avatar
Member

Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 225
OR

10-20-15, 11:42 PM   #1  
baseboard on curved wall?

I've cut all my baseboard and there is one section where the wall Dips inward? What should I do here? The gap is about 3/8th inch? The section of wall is about 2 feet long...just use more nails? Stuff foam in the gap and caulk over?

 
Sponsored Links
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator

Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 19,319
NE

10-21-15, 02:38 AM   #2  
If it is supposed to be straight, the correct thing to do is to add joint compound to the wall to make it straight, then feather that j/c out as far as you need to in order to feather it into the rest of the wall. After you do that, you can put your baseboard on and it will be straight like it should be.

 
marksr's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 42,809
TN

10-21-15, 04:41 AM   #3  
I agree, it doesn't make a lot of sense to leave a big dip in the wall while you are doing all the other work!


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
L.Young's Avatar
Member

Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 225
OR

10-21-15, 11:31 AM   #4  
Name:  baseboard cuve2.jpg
Views: 161
Size:  21.0 KB

Here are a couple pictures. The gap isn't huge. Should I try scaping the wall at the corner? Maybe it is just excess drywall mud? You can see in the image that the problem appears to start about 6" from the corner and extend to the corner. I was thinking of making a diagonal cut on the baseboard itself to give it more play? using compound on the whole wall seems like it would bringing the whole wall out to meet an incorrect corner instead of the other way around?

 
L.Young's Avatar
Member

Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 225
OR

10-21-15, 11:34 AM   #5  
Name:  baseboard curve.jpg
Views: 168
Size:  19.5 KB
Picture number 2. Thanks for the help. I knew that installing baseboard wasn't going to be as easy as it looks.

 
stickshift's Avatar
Group Moderator

Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 18,479
WI

10-21-15, 11:36 AM   #6  
Your wall is textured so you're going to have to attempt to match that when you're done if you modify the wall. Personally, I think I would just try to put a nail or two in the middle of that dip to see if I could bend the trim a little and then be done with it.

Small gaps can also be covered with a little color matched caulk.

 
marksr's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 42,809
TN

10-21-15, 12:21 PM   #7  
IMO it isn't a big deal to fill with j/c and then replicate the texture but assuming that wall is as short as it appears in the pic, I'd probably push it tight, nail it and then caulk/paint.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
czizzi's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 6,972
VA

10-21-15, 12:30 PM   #8  
Provided you have something to nail to, you can get the trim to bend a little. Then fill with caulking and paint to blend. You have a inside corner with joint compound and an outside corner with cornerbead and joint compound and a dip in the middle. Not uncommon to see this. Once painted you will be the only one to notice.

 
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator

Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 19,319
NE

10-21-15, 02:57 PM   #9  
Since the wall is textured, you might split the difference. If your gap is 1/4", put a 1/8" shim behind it and nail the baseboard back tight. The base would have 1/8" of bow, and your gap would be half as wide to caulk. A reasonable compromise.

 
L.Young's Avatar
Member

Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 225
OR

10-22-15, 12:24 AM   #10  
The other problem is that I do not think there is a stud in the middle of this gap. I like the idea of a 1/8" shim right smack in the center. Can I get away with just nailing to the base stud? Like maybe 1 nail every 4 inches or so?

Maybe I just wont bend it and stuff that foam in ther crack and caulk over the top? I appreciate the help!

 
marksr's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 42,809
TN

10-22-15, 03:16 AM   #11  
I wouldn't mess with the foam! You can tack the shim at the bottom plate and use adhesive caulk at the top. For what it's worth, I've caulked 1/4" gaps more times than I care to remember.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
L.Young's Avatar
Member

Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 225
OR

10-22-15, 03:37 AM   #12  
I have 4d finish nails for the baseboard, should I use 6d or 8d for this section instead to try and get a better hold? I will also use liquid nails at top for this section. Im afraid I don't know what you mean by tack the shim? I was planning on cutting two 1/8" strips of baseboard to use as shims and cutting 1" off the top of them so they cant be seen. Tucking them behind the baseboard about 6 inches apart from center of the biggest gap. Then nailing the baseboard to the wall at a steep angle down from the center to try and reach the bottom plate at an angle?

 
marksr's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator

Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 42,809
TN

10-22-15, 04:04 AM   #13  
IMO a 4 penny nail isn't long enough for baseboard. I like to use a 2" or 2.5" [6 or 8 penny] That insures that the nail goes thru the drywall and securely into the stud.


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
L.Young's Avatar
Member

Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 225
OR

10-23-15, 12:18 AM   #14  
So should I secure the 2 ends first and then wedge a couple of these 1/8" thick shims I made between the wall and the baseboard, then nail some finishing nails along the bottom plate at an angle? Of should I glue the shims in place to the wall first and then attach the ends followed by hammering into base plate?

When hammering this 3 1/4" base moulding into the base plate how steep of an angle should use? I read someone suggested starting near the middle with a steep angle in attempt to force the top of moulding closer to wall? Also, how far apart should space these 6d nails?

Thanks!! I'm going for it tomorrow

 
toolmon's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 614
NJ

10-23-15, 05:20 AM   #15  
First, 4d nails are way too short for baseboard. What I would be more concerned about is how your outside corner miter looks rather than that gap. The gap will pretty much disappear when caulked and painted. See how bending in or out affects the miter joint and judge what to do from there. An open inside miter (should really be coped) is easily fixed with caulk, not so easy with an open outside miter.

 
Search this Thread