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installing cap molding


MichaelLP's Avatar
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Join Date: Nov 2015
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FL

11-08-15, 09:55 AM   #1  
installing cap molding

I need to install cap molding around the perimeter of my kitchen as a break between colors. I intend to use it upside down as one color is on painted/groove filled 1/4 inch paneling and the other color is on the cabinets themselves.

Problem is that when I come to a corner, they don't meet well. There is a small opening between strips. This is on an inside corner but figure outside will be the same.

I have and usually DO just caulk it up and repaint that spot but would really like to have them meet as they should.

Am using a 10 inch chop saw to cut the miter but still creates this opening.[HR][/HR]

Any help would be appreciated--

 
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marksr's Avatar
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TN

11-08-15, 10:04 AM   #2  
Welcome to the forums!

Are you referring to base cap? pics might be helpful - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html


retired painter/contractor avid DIYer

 
czizzi's Avatar
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VA

11-08-15, 10:23 AM   #3  
Rarely are inside or outside corners 90 degrees. For inside corners, a coped cut usually is the best and most accurate fit. You will need a coping saw in addition to your miter saw. First, do a 45 degree cut so that the cut surface of the molding is facing the front of the piece. Then, look at the inner cut of the 45 and see how it conforms to the shape of the piece. Use your cope saw to cut exactly on that line to follow the contour of the molding. Make you cut slightly back angled so you carve out a little more wood than needed while still following the line. The opposite wall will get a straight cut piece and then is marries by the contoured cut for a perfect fit. If the fit is off, it usually means you need to carve a little more out of wood that you can't see on the contour cut.

Outside corners sometimes need a 1/2 degree tweak to the angle to make things work, I do test cuts on scraps for outside miters.

 
XSleeper's Avatar
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11-08-15, 10:29 AM   #4  
There are many reasons why a miter might not meet tight.

1). you're cutting two 45's when the angle is not really a 90. If it's a 88, you'd be cutting two 46's.
2). crappy miter saw
3). crappy blade
4). surfaces that the moulding is being applied to are tipped. (not plumb with each other, creating a bevel)
5). operator error - I won't even go there!

 
MichaelLP's Avatar
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FL

11-08-15, 10:38 AM   #5  
Thanks but unable to take a pic of problem.However, it is just a small width-wise opening where the two pieces meet coming from each side (forming the corner). Have used scrap cut at 45 degrees and fitted together and sure enough, there is that opening.

The molding is "cap" molding, about 1 1/2 inch wide overall with approx 1/4 inch of piece 1/4 inch thick. This part fits against the cabinet and thinner/wider part goes over paneling.

Molding is made by "IP molding", #202, and is referred to by label as "cap molding"--sold at Lowes. Believe it is usually used with the thicker side on top.

 
XSleeper's Avatar
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11-08-15, 10:44 AM   #6  
Well then try cutting them at a 44, or 44.5. On a cheap saw, the fence could be out of square as well. If you are cutting it standing up, with the back of the moulding against the fence, try laying it down, with the back of the moulding flat on the table, and instead of setting the miter to a 45, set the miter to 0 and the BEVEL to 45. See if that makes a difference. And cut slowly.

 
amt782's Avatar
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MO

12-08-15, 11:13 PM   #7  
try it by hand

just like a previous poster mentioned it sounds like you need a coping saw to fit the corner perfectly. to be honest... i use an angle grinder with a sanding disc and am usually able to get a near perfect fit btw. my two angles. it also might make your task much easier if you painted this cap moulding to match 1 part of wall or the other not try to paint it half and half... after all- thats kind of the point of trim- an easier transition btw. 2 colors/surfaces etc..

 
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