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Trimming interior window problem


SturdyNail's Avatar
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06-26-16, 07:23 PM   #1  
Trimming interior window problem

Hello,
I'm just getting around to trimming the windows I installed quite a while ago. The windows came with poplar jamb extensions; supposedly sized for 2x4 construction walls. I'm installing a simple picture frame trim with ranch style molding (consistent with the rest of the house).
The problem is that, in many spots, the drywall surrounding the window is proud of the jamb extension.
It seems that I have two choices;
  1. shave back the drywall where it is proud of the jamb extension.
  2. add a thin spacer around the perimeter of the jamb extension; basically, extend the jamb extension so that no area is shy of the drywall.
I'm reluctant to shave back the drywall because, once I've removed the face, I'll likely have a crumbling mess to deal with.
I'm also reluctant to add a spacer around the perimeter because I think that the line between the jamb extension and the spacer will always be evident. Also, I do not own a jointer or planer so it will be nearly impossible to cut a thin spacer of consistent thickness.

What would you recommend?

Thanks in advance.

 
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XSleeper's Avatar
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06-26-16, 07:33 PM   #2  
It would help to know how MUCH the drywall is proud of the jamb. Generally you can shave the drywall down or beat it down with a hammer... seeing as how everything behind the trim will be covered. If you hold the trim up where it will go and draw a pencil line on the wall, that will show you where to limit the hammering/shaving. If the drywall is not sticking out too far, the casing will just tip with the angle of the wall and it will be fine.

If, on the other hand, the window was not pushed in far enough when it was installed, that may be what is creating the problem.

 
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06-26-16, 08:01 PM   #3  
Sounds drastic but that's the way it's done in real life. Commonly called "tenderizing"
If I walk into a home with ranch style molding I think 1970's and out dated.
May want to consider a change.
I've never seen store bought extension jambs line up with the drywall I make my own.

 
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06-27-16, 03:22 AM   #4  
We trimmed windows and doors on a house last week, but no one considered the walls in the main room were bead board planks rather than sheetrock. Naturally all had 1/4" gaps that could not be "beaten" down like sheetrock. It was not being painted, so we had to place strips on the jamb extension to build it out.

 
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06-27-16, 03:34 AM   #5  
What is the gap difference? Is it consistent across the side/top of the window? Does the woodwork stain or paint?

I recently ordered/installed an exterior door and forgot that side of the house was framed with full size 2x4s IMO it isn't a big deal to rip and install a spacer.


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06-27-16, 11:05 AM   #6  
Thanks for your replies @XSleeper, @joecaption ,@chandler, and @marksr.

@XSleeper, I'd estimate the drywall is around 1/8" proud. I'm not at home at the moment to verify, but I'm sure no spots are more than 1/4".
The windows are new construction with nailing fin that I nailed directly to the exterior sheathing, so they're in as far as they will go.

@joecaption, Darn, you make a good point about the ranch trim dating a house. My house is an early to mid-60's ranch. New trim all around would be nice, but, at this point, I'm looking to shed work rather than take more on. I've fallen way behind on my exterior siding project. A couple months ago, I fell from a step ladder that toppled over sideways. I broke 3+ ribs and a thumb. I'm just now easing back into things with projects that only require handling fairly light weight materials.

@chandler, How did your project end up looking after adding the strips?

@marksr, The gap varies. All trim is painted.

Thanks again all!

 
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06-27-16, 11:35 AM   #7  
People think all you have to do is slap a window (or door) against the sheathing and nail it on. WRONG!

Nailing fins are flexible and allow the window to move in and out 1/8" or more... so again, I would say that if the window is flush in some places and not others, check to see if the window can be pushed in farther. Often, installation screws need to be installed through the jamb of the window to hold the window at precisely the correct depth. Shims are required at these points in the rough opening. (Follow mfg's installation instructions)

 
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06-27-16, 02:09 PM   #8  
I'll make a point of taking a couple of pictures tomorrow to show the fillers. They look fine.

 
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06-27-16, 02:11 PM   #9  
1/8" gaps are caulkable but 1/4" should have a filler strip.


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06-27-16, 07:22 PM   #10  
As I look at it, the gap is closer to 1/8" than 1/4".

I certainly wouldn't categorize my installation as just "slapping it in there". The window is flashed well and carefully leveled. I did follow manufacturer's recommendations for shimming. Nowhere in the manufacturer's instructions did it say anything like "the flange is flexible, so push in harder if needed". This is an older house and the exterior face of the framing 2x4's are not all on a perfect plane, so there are some wavy areas in the sheathing.

 
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06-28-16, 03:50 AM   #11  
Smaller gaps can be caulked, even when staining. Our paint guys, and I am sure Marksr will concur, use a stain colored caulk that disappears once the stain is applied.

 
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06-28-16, 04:27 AM   #12  
I've used caulks that are close to the stain color but generally if there is a big gap above base or along side of casing I'll use white caulk and then paint the caulk with the wall paint.

Just reread Larry's post and I don't care much for staining over caulk or any other filler as they don't accept stain like raw wood does.


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07-04-16, 04:37 AM   #13  
Late to the ball, but here is a picture you wanted.

Name:  20160630_122013.jpg
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07-05-16, 06:40 AM   #14  
That looks good Larry. It looks like an intentional detail.

 
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07-05-16, 07:44 AM   #15  
While it doesn't matter a lot if the trim stains/polys leaving a reveal on the filler strip makes caulking a lot easier! Caulking always makes painted trim look better.


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