Do I patch or can I trim on top?


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Old 08-12-17, 05:47 PM
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Do I patch or can I trim on top?

Hi there,
I hired a guy to do my bathroom and he really screwed up so I'm trying to undo the damage and finish it up myself.

He had done a horrible job on the tile baseboards in the bathroom so I decided to take them off and replace them with regular wooden baseboards.

He had used glue/mortar to put the baseboards on. After prying them off, I'm left with what you see in the images.

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My question is, what is the best course of action. Should I be removing the drywall in the baseboard area, replacing it, and then putting baseboards on top. Or can I just clean up what exists without cutting out the drywall and putting baseboards on top of damaged drywall. Considering the drywall will be covered with baseboard, does it really matter what condition it's in?

Thanks
 
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Old 08-12-17, 08:20 PM
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Your baseboard will cover most of it, but the torn paper in the top picture should be primed with an oil primer then coated with joint compound and sanded smooth. Remove any glue that sticks out 1/8" by chipping it off with a chisel.
 
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Old 08-12-17, 09:04 PM
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I agree your main problem is the exposed raw paper.

There's a primer called GARDZ if it's available in your area. The primer is very thin and kind of glues down and seals the paper.
Once the paper is sealed you can then skim coat the torn paper with a wide knife.
Caulk the top of the baseboard and it will look like new.
 
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Old 08-12-17, 10:00 PM
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Ive done a new and old drywall repair for 30 years and never used any type of primer in a situation like this, torn or not, and never had an issue.

Primers is needed afterwards but not for the skim coat.
 
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Old 08-12-17, 10:37 PM
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30 years is a long time.
No primer is OK as long as you are not getting bubbles, and even then you can cut the bubbles out and recoat/sand lightly.
 
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Old 08-13-17, 02:23 AM
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Priming the torn areas with Gardz or an oil base primer first insures that the moisture in the joint compound or latex primer won't cause the surrounding paper to lift off of the drywall. Sometimes you get lucky but I'd rather be safe.
 
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Old 08-13-17, 05:05 AM
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What Marq says is what I've done on several occasions and never had a problem. However, I would recommend what Marksr and Brian say.
 
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Old 08-13-17, 07:51 AM
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Ever since finding Gardz I am a believer and use it religiously on repairs involving torn paper. It takes overnight to dry completely, but has saved countless headaches with bubbling paper from joint compound. Prior to this, I usually recommended cutting out the drywall and adding new as it was easier to redo than to piddle with the paper bubbles.
 
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Old 08-13-17, 07:16 PM
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Thank you all for your comments. I'm glad that I don't have to cut out the drywall and patch it up.
 
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Old 08-14-17, 07:49 AM
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One more vote to seal any exposed gypsum with Gardz or oil based primer first. If the paper is intact, no primer is needed before applying joint compound.
 
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Old 08-14-17, 12:10 PM
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One more point about the Gardz. It also improves adhesion of the mud over semi-gloss paint.
 
 

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