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Trimming interior doors. Large gaps between jamb and trim.

Trimming interior doors. Large gaps between jamb and trim.

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Old 12-17-18, 07:29 PM
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Trimming interior doors. Large gaps between jamb and trim.

Hello, I'm trimming a couple interior french doors where the jambs are NOT flush with the drywall at the tops and bottoms. They're flush for the majority of the jamb, but from the top and bottom hinges they tapper with a 1/4" gap from the hinge up and a 1/2" gap from the bottom hinge down.

I can cut that gap a little by pushing hard against the trim but it's basically just twisting the trim (though, I don't think it would be noticeable once installed).

I've already beat down and cut as much drywall as possible.

So, should I just force it down (twist the ends) and try to caulk the remaining gap or should I try something else? I would cut a filler piece, but the gap is only at the top and bottom. Fillers for those sections only would be good too, but I'm not sure how to make them or make them look right.

Any advise is greatly appreciated. - Rick


 
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Old 12-18-18, 02:21 AM
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Ive had a couple doors that were not installed flush and had similar gaps.

I've marked the back edge then cut the drywall down enough so that the trim fits flush.

It's a pain and takes some time but in the end it looks better than a big gap filled with caulk.
 
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Old 12-28-18, 07:36 PM
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Not sure if you are done with this by now or not.... but...

You just need to add an extension jamb onto the door jamb before you add the casing. It's usually best if the top corners (where the casing miters have to lay) are flush with the wall. So if it's 1/4" there... you might want to just cut a 5/16" rip on a table saw and add that to the jamb.

Your casing miters will lay flat and be just slightly proud of the wall. If needed, shim the outer edges of the casing a little so it doesn't tip. That gap where the casing meets the wall will get caulked.

Then on the bottom, lay your casing on the wall, mark the outside edge with a pencil, then set the casing aside. The casing at the bottom will need to tip at a slight angle, from the pencil line to the 5/16" extension jamb. So you can beat, shave or rasp that drywall down... like Marq was saying, anything inside the pencil line will be covered by the casing.
 
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Old 12-28-18, 08:09 PM
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Thanks for the replies...... I actually got it really tight by just knocking down some drywall and using 15 gauge nails. There's a couple places with 1/32" - 1/16" gaps, but that will easily be covered with caulk. I'm happy with it.

Thank again.
 
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