Wood paneling removal

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Old 07-27-19, 06:01 AM
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Wood paneling removal

What's the best way to go about removing this paneling?
 
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Old 07-27-19, 07:06 AM
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If you intended to attach a photo, it didnt make it. You usually just rip paneling off.
 
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Old 07-27-19, 07:13 AM
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As mentioned, you usually just rip it off. By paneling, I assume you mean a Masonite type product with a thin layer of faux wood over it? I don't know what the correct procedure is today because I haven't dealt with it in a long time, but when it started to become popular whenever that was, maybe 1970ish, give or take a few years, adhesives were gaining popularity as well, and it was not uncommon for it to be glued to the drywall, in which case you will most likely make a mess of that as well.
 
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Old 07-27-19, 07:43 AM
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Heres a picture

so if I RIP it off and it messes with the drywall do I have to replace that?
 
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Old 07-27-19, 08:28 AM
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Depends. And it could be just nailed. I've seen anything from no glue, just nails, to a few dabs they used to tack it in place, to a full coating with a trowel, the latter not being as common, but the only way you'll know for sure is to start ripping it off. Rip being a rather broad term obviously, so get the corner trim off or whatever you need to do then start at one edge and see what you have. Or you may be able to get an idea by pulling off a couple of wall plates and see how it feels. Regardless, it's 50/50 as to whether the drywall was finished first, and even if it were and the paneling is nailed you're going to at least have small holes to patch, so it's just a matter of what degree of work there will be. They often used a ring shank nail, more of a brad size actually but longer, and if they bit good you'll probably find it easier to just rip it off as X first mentioned, let the nails pull through the panels, then go back and take them off.
 
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Old 07-27-19, 11:32 AM
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Looks like they put the trim on top of the paneling. That means the trim comes off first, then the paneling. No way to know if they glued it until you start removing it.
 
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Old 07-27-19, 08:50 PM
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Thanks for the replies. What type of tool should I use to remove the trim and panels?
 
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Old 07-28-19, 02:05 AM
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A stiff putty knife is a good place to start. If you place a small piece of wood/plywood behind the knife or wonder bar you'll minimize damage to the wall above the paneling. Before you start you'll need to take a utility knife and cut the caulking between the molding and the wall.
 
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