treatments to Thrifty Board


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Old 02-10-20, 08:28 PM
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treatments to Thrifty Board

I am lining the walls of my bathroom, excluding the shower/tub enclosure, with 4 x 8 Thrifty Board. The other option was plastic but I did not think a matt surface would offer any cleanability at all. (Smudgeability).
Anyway, what I want to know it whether I can treat the backs and edges with a sealer to make it more water resistant? Or will this cause buckling? I also have a two part epoxy I intend to roll on to the completed wall
since the coating they give you is little better than a primer.
Will the panels remain flat if I roll a finish on the back with panel flat on floor? I know I am not the first to try this so I might as well ask in advance.
 
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Old 02-11-20, 12:29 AM
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Can you provide a link to "Thrifty Boards" I could not find and have never heard of them!
 
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Old 02-11-20, 03:44 AM
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Old 02-11-20, 04:08 AM
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If I were to paint the backside I'd use a solvent based coating as it would be less likely to cause warping along with providing better moisture protection than a latex coating would.
 
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Old 02-11-20, 07:44 PM
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No way would I use this in a bathroom!!
Dry areas only.!
https://images.homedepot-static.com/...2a65c55346.pdf
 
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Old 02-12-20, 02:16 AM
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I also would question why you would want to use this?

I am not sure I am talking about the same product you are referring to. The material I have seen as a shiny surface.
Shiny means smooth so you would have to rough it up before painting it.

Also it is flimsy so I would only use it if it had a backer re: drywall etc.
So why bother with this when you could just use drywall?




 
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Old 02-12-20, 04:00 AM
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There is nothing you can do with that panel to make it last.
What is made for damp areas are FRP panels made of solid fibreglass.
 
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Old 02-14-20, 06:44 PM
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Of course, I have to agree that objectively it is a sub-cheap stuff, enough I understandable to raise some hackles even, but I once saw it done as a cheap fast bathroom and it was done well. Not to say it would last. It was a tenancy anyway.
But said to tell I could not acquire the skills to do it as well as he did. I think in 1970 he charged $150 for the wall job. But he did it in a few hours and it was a marvel.
But actually this may be fine with the ambient moisture in any bathroom, since the shower-tub enclosure is clad with cement board.
In any case, my quest for a cheap, flashy bathroom has advanced. I painted the backs/edges with Thompsons for wood treatment and I was happy it did not cause any bending. So now, I will feel assured that a leak or a spill on the floor will not lead to wavy walls.
At the moment I am tasked with trimming an edge sufficiently to conceal behind the plastic corner trim. The great skill in this job is accurately cutting each piece. That's what I have not got. My biggest problem is I cut out a piece to go around the door. This leggy thing must fit againt the wall and either side of the door and remain within the concealment of the trim. That, or auto bondo, which would be okay since I am epoxying the whole thing once it is up. I will have the kind of bathroom that inspires grafffiti.
 

Last edited by richard123vmt; 02-14-20 at 07:09 PM.
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Old 02-23-20, 07:30 PM
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update

I have found it is necessary to cut and fit each piece before attaching anything. Now I am next going to epoxy each panel. For this purpose I have them in their places, although I would like it better if they were horizontal. But no room for all of that. This way the trim will not be painted over.
 
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Old 04-03-20, 03:11 PM
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As I am finishing up this job (believe it or not) I will post photo when done. It might look good but my ability to match the joints was sub standard. I am just able to pull it together as a job.
In epoxing these panels a strange thing happened. The epoxy, which was recycled, was not mixed well enough as to solids with the result the paint ran abundantly. But the resulting pattern looks like it was intentional. It is running from every square inch. And since the pattern does not show at all escept from an extreme angle, it is not a disaster. I am going to paint the whole thing anyway, since I touched it up with some off white which shows.
I have to conclude that the thrifty board sucks as bad as everyone says. It is a mistake to think of it as Masonite with a finish. That might be okay. In fact, thrifty board is much inferior to Masonite. Now I am installing my flashy Hollywood medicine cabinet.
 
 

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