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Turn existing trim into drywall and paint

Turn existing trim into drywall and paint


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Old 04-11-20, 03:04 PM
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Turn existing trim into drywall and paint

The existing trim has been removed in the pic below. Looking to go trimless and turn it into drywall and paint. Should I simply cut drywall and nail to framing, fill in cracks with joint compound, and texture? Any suggestions appreciated. Not much luck searching anywhere else on the
http://i346.photobucket.com/albums/p...pstongqk4k.jpg
 

Last edited by tom5050; 04-11-20 at 03:26 PM.
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Old 04-11-20, 03:15 PM
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Old 04-11-20, 03:32 PM
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Yes. Install new drywall on the exposed studs where the frame was removed. Add new corner bead to all corners. Add tape and joint compound as needed. Texture and paint.
 
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Old 04-11-20, 04:10 PM
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If you are particular about how it looks, it's not quite that simple unless the window is perfectly centered in the rough opening. The rough opening would also need to be perfectly level and plumb, which they rarely are. That's why they call them "rough" openings. Jambs get shimmed so as to be perfectly straight and symmetrical with the window. The same should be true for drywall returns. But most drywallers just hang and finish the rough opening... I've seen how crappy that can look.

Windows are seldom perfectly centered in the rough opening. So if you just drywall it, the reveals around the window are likely all going to be different. You can tell just by looking at the gap around the window.

You would need to pad the rough opening in as needed if you want the drywall to be as straight and true as the window is.

Additionally, you generally want to use tearaway l-bead against the window to give yourself a nice straight edge to finish. After you tear away the l-bead, you then just caulk the edge to the window. (Painted windows) For windows that are stained and varnished, you dont usually want to caulk it.
 
 

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