Polyurethane Crown molding

Reply

  #1  
Old 09-22-20, 08:29 AM
E
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: DE
Posts: 87
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Polyurethane Crown molding

Hello, I think I'm going to go with the Poly crown molding. Anyone know if I can just use nails or screws to put it in place or I need to use Polyurethane adhesive as my major attachment method? Thank You!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 09-22-20, 09:13 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 23,711
Received 620 Votes on 573 Posts
The primary holding power is the adhesive. You use minimal nails to hold it in position until the glue dries.
 
  #3  
Old 09-23-20, 06:29 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: United States
Posts: 22
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
I installed some a couple years ago with no nails or screws whatsoever. Get a helper, press it into place and hold for a few seconds and it is done. I was surprised at how easy it was. The only issue that I had was hiding seams on some long runs....mostly because i used a gloss enamel and gloss shows everything.
 
  #4  
Old 09-23-20, 07:23 AM
E
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: DE
Posts: 87
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Seams

It's never too late to hide those seams, just use some spackle on your finger and you will have seamless gap!
 

Last edited by ednorton1; 09-23-20 at 07:25 AM. Reason: Spelling
  #5  
Old 09-23-20, 05:42 PM
B
Member
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: United States
Posts: 22
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Well, that's what I did. The seams aren't terrible, but they are certainly not perfect. You can see them in the right light. I probably should have been more patient, but events prior to the installation dictated the "midnight paint and trim crew" for about a week prior to our move in date.

In hindsight, a better spackle compound would have helped, as well as sanding more with water and a sponge. I was scared to sand too much, and I should have approached it with several thinner coats. The spackle shrank into the seams.

Kind of embarrassed to show you my amateur work, but you can see the seams in the closeup, but rarely from the ground unless the light is reflecting off of it. Here are pics... I have no shame!



Hard to see, but the seam is to the right of the white reflection.

You can see the seam in this one because I worked hard to put the reflection right on the seam.

 
  #6  
Old 09-24-20, 02:23 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,642
Received 317 Votes on 281 Posts
For what it's worth, I've painted more than a few houses where the trim carpenter's work wasn't any better .... even sometimes where it was worse
 
  #7  
Old 09-25-20, 09:46 AM
E
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: DE
Posts: 87
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Looks like a nice job. I know its not necessary with this type of molding, but would using a Scarf Joint have made the seam look even better or worse. I wonder if its even an option with this material?
 
  #8  
Old 09-25-20, 05:38 PM
B
Member
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: United States
Posts: 22
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Thanks for being gentle, Marksr. Fortunately, you don't see it unless it is pointed out....but of course, I know it's there.
 
  #9  
Old 09-25-20, 05:42 PM
B
Member
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: United States
Posts: 22
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
It probably would have helped, but I think the big thing is that i was not patient. It was my first and only experience with this stuff. It was actually really easy to install, with the exception of my faux pas. I was actually a little bit afraid of sanding it though...and cutting it....and dinging it.
The other seam came out a lot better, fortunately.

Ahhh, it's good to be humble, right?
 
  #10  
Old 09-25-20, 06:01 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 25,995
Received 667 Votes on 617 Posts
Polyurethane crown works but its the kind of product that is aimed at the do it yourselfer. Cheap and "easy" to install. IMO the polyurethane profiles are probably not an "exact" match, one to the next... there are likely minor differences which makes matching them perfectly difficult.

With wood, you probably have a better chance of having 2 pieces come out of a shaper that are exactly the same size and shape... assuming you aren't mixing up different lots of trim. Plus, wood can more easily be glued together, imperfections filled and the joints sanded flush. Polyurethane is IMO just an inferior product compared to wood. Kind of like comparing DIY vinyl gutters to what is the industry standard... steel or aluminum.
 
ednorton1 voted this post useful.
  #11  
Old 09-27-20, 08:35 AM
E
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: DE
Posts: 87
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
XSleeper, I have not started this project yet, Waiting for it to be delivered by Lowes. Do you think a Scarf Joint is a better way to go, joining the 2 pieces or a straight cut would be just as good. One problem with this material is that it just seems to come supplied with just under 8 ft. lengths. Thanks..
 

Last edited by ednorton1; 09-27-20 at 08:39 AM. Reason: Adding persons name
  #12  
Old 09-27-20, 10:07 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 25,995
Received 667 Votes on 617 Posts
With the polyurethane I don't think it matters. I would definitely recut the ends, don't just butt factory end against factory end. The main reason to scarf a joint is to align and glue those two pieces together better. With wood, you would glue and shoot nails through the scarf. You can't really do that with polyurethane... any glue you put between them will make one sit higher than the other. And nails dont have much holding power in that foam.

Yes, the short lengths are the other problem. Its amateur to have a joint on a wall when its not needed... in other words when you can get wood or mdf crown in 16 ft lengths. But with the polyurethane, it is what it is... Good carpenters are trained to have the least amount of joints possible, even if it creates a little more waste. But if you are going to use the polyurethane you just have to deal with those foibles.

Looks like you are doing just fine to me.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: