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Restore profile of casing before paint

Restore profile of casing before paint


  #1  
Old 02-03-21, 07:00 AM
J
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Restore profile of casing before paint

All,

Not sure if this is a trim or paint item...

The casing around my doorways and windows (about 12 years old) is very crisp, except where the kids have banged it up swinging toys or carrying things through (in their defense, it honestly was a little bit of all of us, including the vacuum too).

Is there any way to restore this trim before painting? I don't want to just paint over it, as the missing chunks will probably just show through. Sanding seems like it will round it off a bit. I've tried filling with drywall compound and then sanding, but that gets messy.

I know most may not care to this level of detail, but this is the OCD I live with.

Looking for the best, most professional option (short of replacing the casing) to prep before paint.

Thanks!
 
  #2  
Old 02-03-21, 07:41 AM
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That's tough to repair. I think your best solution is to sand it down as best you can. Short of replacing it you could cut out the bad section and piece in a new piece. However most likely you'll see the split line. All depends on how good you are with cutting and using filler to mask the split line.
 
  #3  
Old 02-03-21, 08:00 AM
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I've had mixed results rebuilding molding profiles in high traffic areas. I had the best results with Git Rot (a marine epoxy) though I suspect any epoxy probably would work about the same. It had the best adhesion but was too liquid so I either over built the area and sanded it back to shape or mixed in micro balloons to form a putty which hurt adhesion. I got the best results mixing up a batch of both raw liquid and micro balloon paste. I painted the area with the epoxy so it would soak in a bit and get a good hold then while it was still uncured I'd put on the putty. I also had decent luck with auto body filler putty. It was much simpler to work with but putty doesn't stick as well so was more prone to breaking off when hit.
 
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Old 02-03-21, 09:16 AM
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Get a small can of Bondo, apply amounts to both sides, so it flows over the corner, sand down flat, add the radii to the edge, a coat of primer and your done!
 
  #5  
Old 02-04-21, 04:05 AM
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I've used both bondo and durabond for repairing nicks like that. Done correctly you can make the damage disappear BUT it will never be as stout as it was before the repair. The repair will often come loose if that area gets abuse.
 
  #6  
Old 02-04-21, 09:49 AM
J
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Thanks all. I've used some drywall compound before paint as an experiment. I can get it close, but it still rounds over a bit when sanded and the "sharpness" of the edge is lost. I might try a more durable compound.
 
  #7  
Old 02-04-21, 12:05 PM
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I used to use Bondo to fill nail holes but it was overkill and now just use a little compound to fill holes and small voids but for something unsupported like that corner you need something a little more robust!
 
 

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