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Can I use wood paneling in high humidity areas?

Can I use wood paneling in high humidity areas?


  #1  
Old 06-25-02, 05:15 PM
Froggirlashley
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Question Can I use wood paneling in high humidity areas?

Hey guys! I'm slowly but surely trying to remodel the house I've lived in for over 16 years. I figured I would start in our master bathroom. It's small, and hopefully won't cost me an arm and a leg to spruce up a bit. Here's my question... My mom is wanting to get rid of the tile in there. It's in the shower, on the walls... EVERYWHERE! And after 16 years of the SAME thing, you get a little tired of it. Not to mention the fact that it's looking pretty rough now. We want to put up the -- I guess it's fiberglass -- fiberglass wall in the shower, but it will only go up so far... I'm already going to have to replace some of the drywall above the shower because of water damage... My mom wants paneling (wainscoting?) in the bathroom, all the way up the wall. Can I use it in the shower, too? Is there a way to waterproof it well enough that it won't rot? (ABOVE the shower, I mean. Not in the shower itself...) ANY help on this issue would be greatly appreciated! I'm VERY new to this kind of stuff, although it is something I thoroughly enjoy doing! Thanks so much! Look forward to hearing from y'all!
Ashley
 
  #2  
Old 06-30-02, 05:29 PM
R
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I doubt that wood paneling would stand up to a damp area like a bathroom. Although, I've seen some older homes with pine or fir beadboard (wainscoting) in the bathroom... and they have survived many years of dampness.

With that said....if it were my house, I'd stick with ceramic tile. There are hundreds of sizes, colors, and textures to choose from. If installed properly, you'll never have to worry about water damage or dampness.
 
  #3  
Old 06-30-02, 05:46 PM
Froggirlashley
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Thanks :)

Thanks for your input, Rich. But I'm actually trying to get something DIFFERENT than tile, if I possibly can. I'm tired of tile! LOL If I HAVE to, I'll go with that (I think I could install it myself, but if I had doubts, I could always hire a pro ) but I'd rather not... Anyhoo, thanks again! I'll keep searching.
Ashley
 
  #4  
Old 07-01-02, 04:17 AM
R
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I'm in the process of installing beadboard paneling as a backsplash above my kitchen counters. I would have prefered tile, but the wife had final say! I purchased 4x8x 1/8" sheets of unfinished birch beadboard. One coat of primer and 2 coats of latex semigloss provide the finish. I'll caulk the joints, and the top and bottom to ensure no water get's behind.

That could be an option for you.
 
  #5  
Old 07-01-02, 07:23 AM
Froggirlashley
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Hmmmm... Now that sounds simple enough. I'll have to keep that in mind! Thanks, Rich! I'll bet it'll look great in the kitchen, too. I plan on putting in a new backsplash in our kitchen, as well, but I'm going to use pressed tin.
Thanks again for the great idea!!!
Ashley
 
  #6  
Old 07-02-02, 09:12 PM
u28mr19
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I have been told recently, as I am installing wainscoting in our bathroom, to prime the wood on every side. I mean cover the front, back, sides twice or more. Then you can apply a moisture proof paint on the visible side once installed.
 
  #7  
Old 07-03-02, 07:04 AM
Froggirlashley
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Hmmm... Now there's an idea... I would have prefered, I think, a light stain, but painting it might not be so bad... Thanks for the info!
Ashley
 
 

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