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My new problem....


Playdo's Avatar
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08-01-02, 04:17 PM   #1  
Playdo
My new problem....

Well here it is:

My 1990 Pontiac 6000 is running much nicer now, with a few new minor fixes. However, I was driving it around and once in awhile when I make a full turn (90 degrees), or somewhere around a full turn, a loud knock came from the vicinity of the left front tire. It does it only occasionally, but it scared me the first time I heard it. I took my father for a spin in it and he said that it is probably a busted, or breaking CV joint.

What does it sound like to you guys? and if it is a CV joint, whats the deal on that? Is it expensive to be replaced? How long should I drive around on it?

Thanks in advance

Riz

 
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08-01-02, 05:51 PM   #2  
a cv joint will usually make a clunking sound in turns you might go to a parking lot and do some circles in both directions and see if you hear a clunking sound you should hear it more than once, also check your cv boots if any boots are split there is a good chance that you are hearing the joint make noise, once a cv boot gets split it will lose most of the grease out of the joint and will wear out the joint quickly and will then start making noise most noticable in turns whenon the gas.
usually a whole half shaft which is the shaft and two joints for one side can be replaced on most cars within the 150 to 200 dollar range installed.
if kept driving on the noise will get much more noticable and if bad enough can cause a bad vibration while driving.

 
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08-01-02, 06:01 PM   #3  
I have also heard a rapid clicking from cv joints while making turns.

 
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08-01-02, 06:40 PM   #4  
what's not fun about cv joints is waiting to long to get it fixed. mine seized up on me (fortunately as I was turning and ended up in the next parking lot), and then it broke. Very expensive to fix when that happens. Damaged the transmission, fortunately not to bad. The repair went way beyond just replacing the joint (or entire axle and joint, which at times can be less expensive) to replacing the axle, joint and something else in the transmission (manual).

learned the hard way not to wait to have the clunks and clicks checked out.

kay

 
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08-01-02, 09:30 PM   #5  
Playdo
Well, I am pretty sure it is the CV then, and I would love to have it taken care of immediately, but I cant afford it right now (between buying this car, repairing it thus far, and not working for 6 months..... little low on the funds!). I am hoping to start working again within the next week or two. That and my AC being recharged are the first things that will be done (BTW, anyone know how much that costs??). I hope it will last that long, and I think it should.

Thanks goes out to this wonderful board again! I will update this when I get it repaired: cost, mechanic's descrip, etc.

Riz

 
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08-01-02, 09:53 PM   #6  
Just be easy on the turns, slow over bumps, and watch out for potholes and it will probably hold for awhile. I waited until it was constantly popping, and everyday endured 6 speed bumps from heck to and from my apartment every day. Just please don't wait that long! I was lucky when it froze as I was pulling out of a parking lot, turning to the right when it froze up on me. Just sent me into the drive of the next lot. Hate to think what might have happened if it occured on a left hand turn across traffic or while driving down the road.

An a/c charge can vary. I think the minimum I found here in Miss. was $85. Of course I drive a 79 so am using the dreaded R12.

Good luck. Be safe.

Kay

 
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08-02-02, 07:00 AM   #7  
Joe_F
You can buy remanufactured half shafts pretty cheap at most parts stores. About a 100 a side. That's the easiest and most cost effective way to go.

Don't drive it hard or long on wiped out CV joints. Not a good idea.

 
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08-02-02, 09:29 AM   #8  
Playdo
How difficult is that to do yourself? I dont know all that much about cars, and I am sure I dont have many tools. I could have my father and brother help me (they both went to school for auto mechanics), but if they dont have the right stuff, I will have to take it to a garage.

How would I get under the car, and keep it up? Just jacking it would be OK? Let me know anything you can, because I like working on my car, I just dont know all that much about what I need. Plus, I like saving the cash!

 
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08-02-02, 09:45 AM   #9  
JackMaster
Riz, Check out the Autolibrary link below for detailed info and illustrations on R&R of halfshafts to determine if it is a task you are capable of performing.

Absolutely under NO circumstance should you ever rely on just a jack when working on a vehicle. ALWAYS use jackstands!!!
http://www.cybrrpartspro.com/Manual%...delLookup.html

 
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08-02-02, 11:31 AM   #10  
Joe_F
You can get a Craftsman Professional jack and two free stands for about 60 bucks on sale (sometimes even less)

That will be fine for your work here.

 
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08-02-02, 11:07 PM   #11  
Playdo
Thanks for that site link, it will be a big help. I will show it to my father and see if it will be enough for him to do it with me. If not, I will be sure to bring it to a shop.

And with the jack...... duh!! I knew that much! lol, I meant if it being jacked would suffice, or if I would need to have it on a lift, or on blocks, or whatever. Because if that is so, or if I need a lot of special tools, I wont be able to do it.

 
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08-03-02, 03:22 AM   #12  
And with the jack...... duh!! I knew that much! lol

Heheh, I read that the same way Jackmaster did. Reminded me of the time we almost lost my dad years before we actually did because of a bumper jack. Took several grown men to get the car off of him. Luckily he only had a broken collar and some broken ribs.
Get the wheels off the ground, you should have enough room to do the work. Scotch the rear wheels and work on level ground. Can't be too careful

 
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08-03-02, 09:13 AM   #13  
Playdo
Yeah, I guess that I did sound like I meant to just use a jack. My fault. My Great Uncle died the same way, but he had cinderblocks and they gave out and the car crushed him. I have a couple jackstands, and I will be sure to use them.

 
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08-03-02, 10:28 AM   #14  
Of all the things that my instructor taught me at school, the one that always stuck in mind was: use jackstands, even for quick work since you'd otherwise be basing your safety/life on a 50 cent seal. You know, the little black rubber ones.

I always keep one in the back of the truck in case of a flat. They're lightweight and compact enough to allow it to live there, or even in the truck of a car.

Kay

 
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