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high milage motor oil???


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10-04-02, 01:50 PM   #1  
sonja77
high milage motor oil???

Hi, I've got a 95 Toyota Corolla with about 105000 Miles on it's back.

At the last oil change, the guy at Jiffy Lube recommended a high Milage motor oil (Penzoil 10/30) and I agreed to it, it was $10 more.

Now, was that really necessary?
Should I use it again at the next oil change?

TIA, Sonja

 
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10-04-02, 01:52 PM   #2  
Joe_F
Sounds right. The owner's manual recommends 5W30, but at this mileage, I would say 10W30 is better. Less oil consumption.

Generally most places charge the same for 5W30 and 10W30, but then again it depends on the place.

 
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10-04-02, 02:02 PM   #3  
sonja77
Thanks for the quick answer Joe!

Let me clarify my original post a little bit, they charged $10 more for the "high milage" oil.

Is it really necessary to use a "high milage" oil? Or is that just a way to make a little more money for them?

TIA, Sonja

 
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10-04-02, 04:43 PM   #4  
$10 more is basically an ADDITIONAL $2 a quart? What a colossal rip-off! Save your money, those guys must be working on commission.

BTW, my wife's '95 Camry has 140,000 miles and my '94 Toy pickup has over 160,000. They get regular run-of-the-mill 10w30 and not the most expensive brands, either.

 
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10-04-02, 04:58 PM   #5  
Joe_F
There are motor oils of the same grade as "regular" ones that are marketed as "high mileage" oil. Valvoline and Quaker State are two companies that come to mind that have such oil.

Again, stepping up a grade to 'regular' 10W30 should be fine. There's your "high mileage" oil right there. Ask for 10W30 next time and compare the price to the other oil. Go back to the shop and ask them what benefits/why you need to use this higher priced oil in your vehicle.

I can tell you, like TowGuy that I use quality oil (not the most expensive either) and all of my engines are spotless inside. It's a matter of being routine rather than using "top shelf" stuff and not not changing it as often.

I would avoid those quick lube places at all costs. Leave your car upkeep to a competent repair shop. In the end, it doesn't cost more.

 
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10-04-02, 06:25 PM   #6  
knuckles
The 'high mileage' oils contain additives that swell leaking seals. These additives can actually destroy otherwise good seals. They're overpriced too! A can of 'engine oil stop leak' contains the same active ingredients & it only costs about $4.

 
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10-05-02, 07:21 AM   #7  
Joe_F
In my belief, if you have to use that goo in your engine, you should pitch the car....it's on borrowed time.

Simple maintenance and routine upkeep will keep any decently engineered car going a very long time!

 
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10-05-02, 07:28 AM   #8  
I wouldn't necessarily condemn all quick lube places, but I can tell you I would never go back to one that soaked me an extra $10 for "high mileage" motor oil regardless of how they explained the justification for it. They're more interested in separating you from your money than helping you properly maintain your vehicle.

 
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10-06-02, 09:45 AM   #9  
Dan Meyer
Using a 10W30 engine oil instead of a 5W30 will not reduce oil consumption. Both oils are of the same viscosity at operating temps. (100 C). The difference between the two is at LOW temps. If cold starting is a problem then 5W30 is the better choice. So called "high mileage" oils are just a gimmick to gain a larger market share with older cars.

 
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10-06-02, 10:14 AM   #10  
Joe_F
I simply use 10W40 in the older GM's I have as most of the ones given to me had questionable maintenance history .

Other than that, I use 10W30 all the way around as per the owner's manual (unless it's bitter cold out).

 
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10-06-02, 01:09 PM   #11  
sonja77
Thanks for everybody's input. :-)

I'll skip the high milage oil in the future and use regular 10/30 motor oil. We live in VA so I'm not really too concerned with cold starting.

Sonja

 
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10-07-02, 04:20 AM   #12  
LOL. I've been in VA in the winter (Quantico). I was COLD!

 
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10-07-02, 09:09 AM   #13  
Joe_F
Alternatively, you can use 5W30 for your application unless as stated, you are cold start burning oil (not likely...lol). This will net the maximum fuel mileage and won't sacrifice performance.

Is the vehicle consuming oil?

 
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10-07-02, 10:43 AM   #14  
Wow, this ongoing oil commentary is very educational. I thought that 10W40 was best for colder weather because it sticks to engine parts better allowing them to get going from a cold start easier. Also, what does the number before the W and after the W stand for? For that matter, what does the W stand for? Also, when should fully synthetic vs. semi-synthetic (or blends) vs. natural motor oils be considered?

 
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10-07-02, 12:24 PM   #15  
Joe_F
Just the opposite. 40 weight is better for HOT weather as it provides great protection. 40 is obsolete product, it has not been updated in some time and is not approved for most modern engines.

10W40 is good for older engines that recommended it in the owner's manual or for higher mileage engines that would consume 30.

10W40= acts like a 10 weight in the winter, a 40 in the summer.
SAE30 (or 'straight' 30)= Acts like a 30 weight oil in all temperature.
etc, etc. The W should mean "winter".

Most newer cars use 5W30 or 10W30, but there are variations. The owner's manual should be consulted/followed in all cases.

Sythetic provides the best benefit in cases where the OEM recommends/demands it (such as the Chevy Corvette) or racing applications. Not needed for a street car.

Change your oil and filter regularly, use good quality parts and your car will last a long time on regular oil of the proper grade. No need for synthetic.

 
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10-07-02, 01:37 PM   #16  
Technically the season has no impact on the oil (other then the first few minutes after start-up) since the oil will be at "summer" temperatures very quickly...

 
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10-07-02, 04:36 PM   #17  
And just so we haven't missed anything, SAE as in "SAE 10W30" stands for Society of Automotive Engineers.

 
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10-09-02, 01:18 PM   #18  
sonja77
Originally posted by Joe_F
Alternatively, you can use 5W30 for your application unless as stated, you are cold start burning oil (not likely...lol). This will net the maximum fuel mileage and won't sacrifice performance.

Is the vehicle consuming oil?
Yes, the vehicle is consuming oil, I'd say I add about a quart in between oil changes (every 6 months).

So, now with winter coming up, should I use 5/30 instead of 10/30?
How cold exactly does it have to be so that a 5/30 oil would be the better choice?

TIA, Sonja

 
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10-09-02, 01:31 PM   #19  
Joe_F
Your owner's manual should have a chart which will guide you as to which grade of oil to use with what temperature range. Typically if you anticipate zero or below, you should use 5W30.

I would say 5W30 is fine, but a quart between oil changes (depending on on how many miles between them) is ok/borderline excessive.

You should be fine with either grade, 5W30 or 10W30.

 
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10-17-02, 11:20 AM   #20  
I drove my car 2,300 in three days on fresh 10w-40 oil and I now wish I had used straight 30 grade mixed in or 100% 30 grade for that trip.
the engine now slightly smokes blue on start up -not always though.
car had 32K at the time.
Multi grade oils break down faster in my opinion.
is it ok to mix grades? what would you use for such a long millage trip? any thought on that?

 
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10-17-02, 12:21 PM   #21  
As Joe mentions above, go back to your owners manual. I have not seen a car in the last 30 years that specifies single grade oil. Any drop in outdoor temperatue, that 30 weight turns to mollasses.

If you are blowing blue smoke, and/or using excessive oil, you have mechanical problem.

 
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