car oil

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  #1  
Old 10-14-02, 05:39 PM
rhonda67
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car oil

HI I HAVE A QUESTION......WHEN I TOOK MY CAR IN THE SHOP. MY MECHANIC TOLD ME I HAD NO OIL IN THE CAR..... IS THIS POSSIBLE. I THINK HE MAY BE LYING , I DIDNT THINK CARS COULD RUN OUT OF OIL, DOESNT THE CAR REGENERATE ITS OWN OIL.?? HE ALSO SAID I COULD HAVE BLOWN MY MOTOR. MY FIX ENGINE SOON LIGHT HAS BEEN ON FOR ABOUT A MONTH...... THANKS FOR YOU IMPUT..... THE CAR I HAVE IS 2001 BUICK LESABRE
 
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  #2  
Old 10-14-02, 09:25 PM
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No, a car doesn't regenerate oil. If you ran the car out of oil, it would cause the engine to become so hot that it will seize up. Oil is what you put in it to keep the moving parts inside the engine from rubbing together, and becoming hot enough for piece to weld to each other.

How long have you had this car? Every car needs an oil change every 3 months or if heavily driven then more often. The oil level should be checked every week, as should the water level.

Kay
 
  #3  
Old 10-15-02, 03:55 AM
Joe_F
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First, kill the caps. No need to shout.

I suggest you sit down and read the owner's manual. The car doesn't generate anything but pollution .

The owner's manual is a good start to the theories of auto repair and maintenance.

Kay gave you a good synopsis on oil.

It's a 2001 vehicle, you should take better care of it. Use the maintenance schedule in the glovebox to guide you as to when to have services done on the vehicle. There are also good books in the local library you can read up on to learn more about what you can check.
 
  #4  
Old 10-15-02, 04:40 AM
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But to answer your main question; no, your engine was very unlikely to have had "no" oil in it. What he probably meant was no oil on the dipstick, meaning you were 2 or more quarts low (not a good thing). If you drain the oil out and drive the car you might get 1/4 mile before the engine started to knock (rapid, heavy metal-on-metal sound) and before you got more than a mile or so the engine would likely completely seize and would never run again. Also, read the light on your dash again. It probably says "check" engine or "service" engine. Haven't seen one yet that says "fix" engine. The check engine light could mean a lot of things; only way to know is to have the trouble codes read by a scanner/aanalyzer. As kay and joe suggested, familiarize yourself with your owner's manual and especially to two items under the hood - checking your oil and checking your coolant. These would be the two easiest things to check and that are the two most likely items to lead to a catastrophic engine failure if neglected.
 
  #5  
Old 10-15-02, 11:06 PM
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Great advice from these guys. Be SURE that your engine is cold to the touch before you open your radiator cap. Hot coolant under pressure can put you in the hospital.
 
  #6  
Old 10-16-02, 05:32 AM
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Dan you are so correct on the cool engine (to the touch) and what can happen if you don't! I was setting the timing on a VW and a lower radiator hose blew. What fun. I was extremely lucky that it got only on my forearm, however it was both a scald and a chemical burn.

My dad taught me that on Saturday morning, before I started my day to go out to my car and check the oil, water, and tire pressure. Top off anything that needed it. Then, before I went anywhere that day to start the car about 10 minutes early so I could also have time to check the transmission fluid and top it off if necessary (or if I didn't have anywhere to go to warm up the car and check the transmission fluid AFTER checking the other things). Just a routine, and a good day to do it since my Saturdays are usually 'play' days or activities started later in the day. Oil changes were done on Saturdays, too. The first Sat of every March, June, September, and December. This was also tune-up day since we were already in mechanic mode . I started this routine when I was 16 and started driving, and now that I'm 40 its still second nature.

Kay
 
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Old 10-16-02, 06:16 AM
Joe_F
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That's a neat story.

A little goes a long way with car maintenance .
 
  #8  
Old 10-16-02, 06:46 AM
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Oh, I guess from the story you could tell that I didn't do something else my father made a part of the routine (that I neglected to post): checking hoses and belts EVERY Saturday morning. 7 days doesn't sound like much, but a car is a hard worker and a lot can occur in that short period of time. Especially if you're 16! Even at 40 .

I know that a lot of people complain that they don't money to replace things on a regular basis, but what's the alternative? Replace a hose when it begins to need it not afterwards and then you save a tow bill, AND a hose replacement. Check the oil, change the oil & filter and save yourself a tow, and possibly engine work. If you want to keep it, have it serve you for many years, then take care of it.

Kay
 
  #9  
Old 10-16-02, 07:56 AM
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Hey, let's not save TOO much on tow bills, LOL!

I'm not worried, non-maintainers will always be in the majority. I just LOVE people who overheat on the Interstate and then "just drive it to the next exit". Nothing like turning a $50 tow bill into a $1000 engine job.
 
  #10  
Old 10-16-02, 08:44 AM
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Okay, so I don't have it totally together LOL. I know my tow guy on a first name basis!

"Hey Steve, its Kay. "

"Hey Kay, where are you and which vehicle are you in?"


 
  #11  
Old 10-16-02, 10:05 AM
Joe_F
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Believe it or not, I have towing insurance on all of my cars.

If I get a flat at a show with one of my Trans Ams, if I cannot plug the tire, it has to be towed .

1) I am not depleting the NOS GM air canister I have. Hard to find. LOL. (Yes, they can be refilled).

2) The inflatable spare tire is a virtual joke in a 2nd generation F car. They reall expect that thing to work? LOL.

3) You then have the bright idea of where you're going to stuff that big P225-70R15 tire. It "ain't" fitting in the trunk with relative ease. LOL.

4) It's cheaper for a tow and I get reimbursed .
 
  #12  
Old 10-16-02, 11:21 AM
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Fortunately I saved a tow bill Monday. My husband was home and brought the air compressor in the back of his shop truck. Had a plug fail (I didn't do this one, my brother in law did), discovered that the portable tank's valve was faulty (borrowed this from same BIL-just in case), and my spare is worthless!

Got it home and plugged it OFF the truck instead of trying to play contortionist and not doing it correctly.

Tow insurance sounds good. There have been a couple of times that on this old truck the fuel gauge sticks so I've run out of gas trying to push on to a station to fill up. Embarrassing when you have to call a tow service since you can't find anyone to bring you fuel! Steve (my tow guy) usually sends his wife Pam to help me with a can of gas. They are a really sweet couple. Rare to find someone like that.


Kay
 
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