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Hyundai timing belt tensioner


CMil's Avatar
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11-06-02, 09:41 AM   #1  
Hyundai timing belt tensioner

Please help! The water pump recently gave out on my '91 Hyundai Sonata, 2.0l DOHC 4-cylinder. I replaced it without incident (other than kicking myself for not having replaced it when I did the timing belt less than 25,000 miles back). Now, it's time to set the timing belt back on, and I need to set the plunger on the tensioner back to its original position in order to pre-load the tension on the belt.
The Chilton's manual calls for a special tool that bolts to one of the engine brackets and pushes the plunger back in. It never mentions a tool manufacturer or where the tool is available from ( although I'm sure a dealer would be happy to provide one for a phenomenal fee). And, accepting that this is the case, I still live about two hours' drive from the nearest dealer. Can someone enlighten me as to a "backyard" or "on the cheap" way to perform this task? I would greatly appreciate any input! Thanks - Chris

 
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11-06-02, 09:43 AM   #2  
Joe_F
It is probably a Hyundai unique tool.

Check the links and posts in my signature file for where to get Hyundai special tools. You can check with a parts store to see if they have it, but they are not likely to carry it if it's unique to Hyundai.

 
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11-07-02, 11:28 AM   #3  
Hyundai timing belt tensioner

Thanks, Joe_F. As soon as I get offline today, I'm going to get in touch with Service Solutions, per your advice, regarding the tool to retract the tensioner plunger. What I would like to know meanwhile is whether anybody out there knows if it's simply a matter of pushing the plunger back into the body, as with simple pressure, or if there's some sort of valve on the tensioner that needs to be opened before the plunger will move back down? Any further advice will be greatly appreciated. Thanks again - Chris

 
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11-07-02, 07:28 PM   #4  
you remove the hydraulic tensioner held on by 2 bolts put it in a vise and compress it slowly it will push right in then you slide a heavy wire or a small drill bit through the hole in the tensioner to keep the plunger retracted, once you have installed belt and removed all slack in belt by rotating tensioner pulley you then can remove the wire to release the plunger on the hydraulic tensioner.

 
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11-08-02, 09:37 AM   #5  
Hyundai timing belt tensioner

Thanks again, Joe_F and bejay! I thought about the vise thing, and thought I remembered using a shop press to do the same thing last time. However, at present I have access to neither press nor vise (this will be remedied!). A phone call to the website Joe_F refers to in his signature file netted loads of useful information. The tool referred to in the Chilton's manual, MD998738, matches the number on a Mitsubishi dealer-essential tool. The rep at Service Solutions gave me a description of the tool; it appears to be little more than a 2-1/2" long set screw, m8x1.25, costing in the $30 neighborhood. In looking at the engine to see how such a tool would work, I found a threaded hole in the left engine support bracket, said hole running perpindicular to the crankshaft. There is also a rubber plug on the back of the timing cover mating surface, in line with the hole in the bracket. A trip to the local specialty hardware store yielded a 3' length of m8x1.25 threaded rod and two nuts for less than $6. 7-8" of this rod with the nuts jammed together on one end to drive the rod sets the plunger back into the tensioner body just great, with no removing the tensioner. Needless to say, I'm pleased on two counts - made the tool myself, and saved money, too! I also made a tool to keep tension on the tensioner pulley while tightening the pivot bolt out of some 1/4"x1" bar stock, 2 roll pins, a 5/16'x1/2' cap screw and a 5/16" hex nut. Making this tool was a little more involved, but I'd be happy to share how I did it. Anyone interested can e-mail me at [email protected]. Both these tools will probably work with few or no modifications on similar Mitsubishi engines, since their counterparts in the manual are Mitsubishi tools and since Hyundai used Mitsubishi engines for many of their early years, and most likely copied most of the features when they started using their own. Hope this helps anyone working on these cars/engines. Thanks again to everyone at DIY, staff and members alike. Talk to you soon - Chris

 
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11-08-02, 03:55 PM   #6  
Joe_F
Good job and thinking

 
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