Trans Fluid Foamy

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  #1  
Old 12-18-02, 11:56 AM
bill248
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Trans Fluid Foamy

On my 1989 Chev 2.8FI engine I find trans fluid to be foamy and seeming like too much in there. have regular oil changes but no one ever mentioned this. Is this something that can be taken care of simply or does it need to go to a garage or dealer? Most places charge $150 for a transmission service which includes changing fluid plus cost of flluid and other repairs found. If someone has just added fluid can the excess just be siphoned out without removing the pan? It has 146000 miles and the fluid has been changed once at around 100,000 miles because my driving doesnt fit the owner manual profile for more frequent changes, although JiffyLube et al wants to do it every 15000 miles. Just didnt want to take it to garage and be socked for what I wouldnt know to be unnecessary repairs. What is best approach? Thanks for any advice.
 
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  #2  
Old 12-18-02, 12:00 PM
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To answer one of your questions: yes, too much transmission fluid will make it foamy and needs to be taken care of either by you draining the extra fuild out, or by someone (mech) doing it, soon. It will cause problems with your transmission (burned out clutches, slipping gears, etc) if you don't.

Kay
 
  #3  
Old 12-18-02, 02:47 PM
Joe_F
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Change the fluid and filter as shown in autolibrary (access it through my "The Basics" post below) and refill it to the proper capacity with Dexron III fluid.

Otherwise, Kay gave you correct advice.
 
  #4  
Old 12-18-02, 03:21 PM
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Joe,

Its been awhile since I've been in school, and I've lost some of the information that I haven't used. I understand why the fluid foams, why it is the same and/or worse than not enough fluid, but what makes it necessary for a fluid change? If you don't mind explaining.

Thanks,

Kay
 
  #5  
Old 12-18-02, 04:44 PM
Joe_F
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Ease . By the time you figure out how much to drain (a quart, 7 quarts, 3 quarts, 3.5 quarts, etc) you could simply just start over and make sure you're putting the right amount in.

You drain out what you think is a quart and then, ah shoot, still high. Lol. Another quart, ah shoot, high again.

Just drain whatever's in the pan, install a new filter and refill to capacity. Done .

Remember that most vehicles don't have a drain plug for the tranny pan and once you remove it the gasket it's no good again.

The bottom line is you cannot be sure how much to remove, so it's best to drain the pan, change the filter, put a new pan gasket, seal it up and refill to the right capacity. Then you are sure you've got it right.

Also, it is imperative to drain it from down below so that you are compelled to change the filter. Some places skip that if they suck it up from top. Also gives you a chance to check what's going on around there.

Original poster: 100k on a tranny fluid change is WAY too long. 25k intervals are best for almost every type of driving.

Tranny fluid changes are a lot less expensive than transmisisons. For 50 bucks, any independent garage will do a fluid and filter change on most vehicles. Not sure where you get the 150 dollar price .
 
  #6  
Old 12-18-02, 06:40 PM
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I am assuming that the tranny oil change is for the same reasons that you change the oil. Over time, the oil (mainly oil) and tranny fluids break down and then can start harming your engine and tranny. Is that a correct assumption?

Kay
 
  #7  
Old 12-18-02, 07:29 PM
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yes you do change the fluid do to it breaking down and insuring the filter isnt restricted and starving the pump for fluid, but 50 bucks is a little to cheap when most models call for about an hour labor or even more depending on vehicle.
 
  #8  
Old 12-18-02, 07:35 PM
Joe_F
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Like most automotive fluids, time and mileage wear them out. Replacing them along with the filter keeps the works clean
 
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Old 12-18-02, 09:04 PM
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Thanks



Kay
 
  #10  
Old 12-19-02, 03:17 AM
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Also there is an anti-foaming agent that gets used up when the fluid foams.

Larry
 
  #11  
Old 12-19-02, 04:58 AM
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I'm going to have to drag out my text books from school and review oils and their properties. I had forgotten about the anti-foaming agents.

Kay
 
  #12  
Old 12-19-02, 09:07 AM
Joe_F
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You're welcome.
 
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