'90 Plymouth Grand Voyager - no start

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Old 12-19-02, 05:38 PM
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'90 Plymouth Grand Voyager - no start

Yep - me again! Some time back, I posted about a terrible engine noise on a '90 Plymouth Grand Voyager with a 3.3l V-6 and overdrive automatic. Removing the serpentine belt revealed a wobbly water pump shaft and tensioner pulley - minor problems to repair. However, while trying to start the beast, all it would do is backfire through both the intake AND exhaust. I've done no more work on the vehicle other than to locate the two loose parts mentioned before. Now for the additional info - the van has been sitting for a little over a year with about 1/8 showing on the gas guage. A close visual inspection under the hood turned up leaking hoses from the air cleaner box to the front valve cover and from the rear valve cover to the pcv valve. Also, the front three spark plug wires have been replaced somewhat recently, while the rear three appear to be factory original. The obvious question is,"Why no start?", but that's just the beginning. The van started 4-5 weeks ago; has the gas turned to $#!+ to the point that it never will again without replacing it (fouled injectors and the like)? Will the bad pcv hoses affect things so badly that it could cause a no-start? Doesn't backfire at both ends indicate spark and some movement of fuel/air through the engine? These are probably all basic, fundamental things to the trained professional, but that's not me! Any help in finding a starting point to work from would be greatly appreciated! Thanks a ton - Chris
 
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Old 12-19-02, 06:16 PM
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Start with my "The Basics" post below.
 
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Old 12-20-02, 03:03 AM
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PCV vlave hose must be intact or you will have a big vacuum leak. The fuel in the tank should be drained as old gas doesnt burn well.
 
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Old 12-20-02, 07:24 AM
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Okay, the pcv hose thing makes sense. By the way, this van has port fuel injection (what doesn't anymore?); is it possible to flood an engine so equipped, or is that completely unique to carbureted engines? I can check for proper spark next time I'm near the van, too. Is there a good (read EASY) way to empty the fuel tank without dropping it from the vehicle? And how about the fuel in the lines, pump, fuel rail and injectors; do I need to make that go away, too? If so, what's the best way to approach that task? Thanks in advance, moderators and members - you're always so much help I can't believe it! - Chris
 
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Old 12-20-02, 11:58 AM
Joe_F
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First, check for spark and fuel or lack thereof before jumping into things.

Rent a fuel pressure gauge from Autozone to test the the fuel pressure and see if matches the specs shown in Autolibrary.org through my "the Basics" below.

No, there's no drain on most fuel tanks, so if it's a fuel pump and the tank is full, GET help, as it will be heavy when you drop it.
 
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Old 12-20-02, 07:38 PM
roland1978
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to empty tank- disconnect the fuel line from fuel rail( large hose) and turn key on it will pump all the fuel out with the pump for you. I work at a dodge dealer and see it everyday. For the back fire it sounds like the timing is off or, timing belt has slipped a couple of teeth, may be stuck valves too.
 
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Old 12-20-02, 08:55 PM
knuckles
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Smile

Roland1978:

you work at a dodge dealer. You should know that a 3.3L has a timing CHAIN, not a belt!

Also, the ASD relay will shut down the fuel pump after a few seconds if it doesn't see an RPM signal.

The ASD relay can be jumped out to empty the tank via the fuel pump if you have a wiring diagram.

BUT....

I'd start w/ a basic compression test before I bothered with any of the above. You don't want to go chasing phantom electrical problems, so make sure the engine itself is mechanically sound (timing chain is good) before you spend too much time messing w/ the fuel.
 
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Old 12-21-02, 08:51 AM
Joe_F
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I agree with Knuckles.

Can't help much until this poster gives us some more information as a result of checking "The Basics"
 
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