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AC sealer???


mitcheal's Avatar
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12-22-02, 04:55 PM   #1  
AC sealer???

i apparently have a slow leak in my AC, 2000 nisaan frontier 4x4. i got a unit to test the pressure today, and noticed that they sell a "sealer" that you put into the low side, like freon. It's supposed to stop any leaks. has anyone heard of it or have any tips?

thanks
mitch.

 
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12-22-02, 06:50 PM   #2  
1fireman
If it's a 2000 isn't it still under warranty?? I would take it in and let them deal with it.

 
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12-22-02, 06:54 PM   #3  
Joe_F
I agree with Fireman. This was told to you by me in a previous post. What was the result of contacting Nissan?

No, the goo in a can won't work. The leak must be fixed properly and the system recharged correctly.

 
mitcheal's Avatar
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12-22-02, 06:59 PM   #4  
that was my reson for asking about this. Nissan will not cover it. i'm at 42,000 miles....


i bought a kit to check the pressure. i'll check it out tomorrow and keep an eye on it so i can see how bad the leak is.


thanks.

 
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12-22-02, 07:07 PM   #5  
Joe_F
Check alldata.com. There are a few A/C related bulletins for your model by just a quick check. You might want to have the dealer print them out for you to have a look. They might clue you into what the problem is.

You cannot diagnose A/C systems properly unless you have the proper tools, procedures, knowledge and service procedures on AC. It is NOT DIY repair without this stuff. A pressure gauge is only ONE tool for AC repair. You may not even have a leak. It could be another component that has failed. In a prior post, you stated you added some R134A, that may have overcharged it (just as bad as undercharged) if there's not a leak.

My vote: Visit the dealer, have a look at the bulletins and digest it. If there's something in there that's a pattern type failure after reading the full bulletin, call up Nissan corporate and complain. You might get them to repair it free under a goodwill warranty (even though you're over the mileage...not by much).

 
Jason R's Avatar
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12-24-02, 07:37 AM   #6  
Stop leak won't work. At best it'll slow the leak.

If you threw a can of r-134 in without taking a pressure reading then don't go any further (by adding anything else). You can do damage to your a/c system and, more importantly, yourself by guessing with a/c systems. Flash freezes from liquid refrigerant are likely if you blow a line from overcharging. (While you're working on it, I mean... not while driving)

Once you can figure out how bad the leak is then you can determine if it's feasible for you to just add as you need it. It's not really recommended because you'll be guessing as far as the oil in the system (and how much to add... or if). I've had rather good luck with my guessing with the oil, but we're talking about 15-20 year old cars that aren't going to be around for much longer, and r-12 systems which don't operate at near critical pressures (when things are going right)!

Here we're talking about a vehicle that has a long life ahead of it. Decide now if you want a/c working for the life of the vehicle (or how long you plan to keep it). If you want the a/c to last a long time you need to have things done correctly (no guessing AT ALL….. OR STOP LEAK). If you want a/c for only a few more years then... well you see what I'm getting at.

 
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12-24-02, 07:56 AM   #7  
Joe_F
I would agree with Jason, but......

The days of "topping it off" are LONG gone. It is either fixed right, or not fixed at all. This is a 2000 vehicle, not a 1972 beater. Fix the A/C correctly and properly.

I have a 1984 Oldsmobile Delta 88. The AC works correctly, properly and WELL . It may not be the most polished car on the block (I got it that way..lol), but my windows are up and I'm cool in the summertime. LOL.

The source of the leak (if there is one) must be found and the cause of the trouble corrected. It may be a leak, it may be electrical/pressure related.

Something to consider: You can save your money on those sealers and put it toward a Nissan factory manual---this is a worthy investment and will pay you off in the long haul over the lifetime you own this thing.

 
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12-24-02, 08:07 AM   #8  
As always... great advise from joe.

I must admit I'm a bit unorthodox at times.

Of course when I finally get my tool inventory up to the point where I have a vacuum pump and recovering machine (hopefully next summer weeee!) I'll have good correctly running a/c in all of my cars.

2000 car? I'd think for a long time before doing anything other than having it fixed the right way.

 
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12-24-02, 08:16 AM   #9  
Joe_F
Lol. Tools cost money and it's a boon when you come across them or get them reasonably priced.

I shop swapmeets and garage sales for things and also through friends in the industry. Usually, when you shop around, you get a good deal.

I recently went out for a walk after dinner and found a toolbox FULL of junk and tools. After sorting it all out, I took what was good, including a MAC screwdriver. I called up MAC and they sent me a new one .

Got myself a working large grease gun in the "deal" too .

You can do well, just shop smart .

 
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12-25-02, 08:04 PM   #10  
knuckles
I have to agree w/ Joe_F when it comes to shopping smart.

Swap meets, estate sales & auctions are great sources of tools if you have the time to invest in them.

You can spend all day at an auction or estate sale, but it's worth it if you come home with a few good deals. You can often find HUGE bargains on professional quality tools & equipment, especially if the seller has no idea of what they're worth.

As a bonus, you may find other (not tool related) stuff at auctions, estate sales & swap meets for such bargain prices that it really makes the day worthwhile.

If nothing else, you'll have spent a day out of the house walking around getting some fresh air.

 
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12-26-02, 02:18 AM   #11  
Joe_F
I'm with Knuckles on this one again .

I have scored stuff at swap meets that I never thought I'd find.

Case in point:

1) 1979 Motor Vacuum and wiring diagram manual---$6.00...goes for 94 from Motor.
2) Craftsman rivet gun-$4.00 Made in USA. Current models are made in Taiwan.
3) Intake and carburetor for my Turbo Trans Am and 400 Pontiac, 25 bucks for the pair.
4) Ball joints and bushings for my F body car. Moog in the box...guy wanted 35 bucks for it, it was the end of the day, I said, "10 bucks max". He said, "Yea, sounds good. I don't feel like packing this crap up!".

5) The kicker: Craftsman Tool guy. I picked out a load of wrenches from the guy and laid them out. He says, "Hmm, let's see, 60 bucks". I scoffed and said, "Way too high". He says, "Hey buddy, I've been doing this a long time and I know my prices, etc, etc, etc, etc.". I laughed, snickered and whipped out a 2003 Craftsman tool catalog with all the pages marked with sticky notes and the prices laid out. I had done my homework about a week before. I said to the guy, "You haven't been doing it longer than I have " Naturally, he was curious about the prices and I told him he'd have to come down about 20 bucks or throw in some more for me to buy anything as I could buy them new at Sears for about the same price or less with my discount.

Moral of the story: Full 1/4 to 1" wrench set, 1/2" Breaker bar (new), and 5 screwdrivers for the same 60 bucks.

Big difference.

Shop smart, not silly .

 
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