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"Dry" Battery Storage?


wisconsincraft's Avatar
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01-21-03, 04:45 AM   #1  
"Dry" Battery Storage?

Back in October, I got a replacement battery from Wal-Mart for one that died prematurely (bad cell).

When I got the new battery, it did not have any battery acid in it. I have since stored the battery in my basement (cool) and sitting on a board to keep it off the concrete. No acid has ever been put into the battery.

My questions are .......

How long can I store this new battery (WITHOUT acid) ?

Will storing the battery "dry" be detrimental to the longevity of the battery once it is put into service?

 
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01-21-03, 06:03 AM   #2  
Joe_F
Purchase a battery that is fully charged and ready to go.

Maintenance free batteries such as Delco are far superior to the wet type you've got there. I always found those silly.

 
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01-21-03, 01:05 PM   #3  
Joe,
You didn't answer my question.

I already have the new battery.

The battery is NOT a "dry" type battery. It is a typical deep cycle battery that uses acid. It came WITHOUT acid.

How long can it be stored without acid before it might give a problem?

 
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01-21-03, 03:44 PM   #4  
Joe_F
Correct. And I'm telling you that maintenance free batteries are far less messy and superior in every aspect . So, if that's available for your application, return it for one of those .

Barring that, I'm sure your battery is fine until spring when it's needed. Eventually, the air would corrode the plates in the battery. I always like to buy fresh batteries when I need them. If the piece of equipment is not going to be used for a while, no sense in holding on to a battery for it. Just buy it when you need it

 
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01-22-03, 04:49 AM   #5  
Not to dispute Joe Cool, but I suspect your battery would still be usable after several years. Although there may be some surface corrosion of the plates from the ambient air, I would think that would be fairly minor . The battery is designed to produce voltage by the chemical reaction between the lead plates and the acid, so it shouldn't begin to have significant "wear" until the acid is added.

My $.02 worth.

 
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01-22-03, 06:03 AM   #6  
Joe_F
True...but why incur the cost of something like that before you need it? .

Plus, who wants acid hanging around?

 
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01-22-03, 09:37 AM   #7  
For the record..... I got the battery as a "warranty replacement" for the original battery that failed. (See my original post). The "replacement" battery came WITHOUT acid.

Right or wrong, my main question has been addressed by
"The-tow-guy". (Storing a battery with no acid in it)...

I will hold the battery WITHOUT ADDING ACID unitl I am ready to put it into service later this year.

Thanks to all who have contributed.

Dave

 
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01-22-03, 09:47 AM   #8  
Joe_F
You could have simply asked the maker of the battery (Exide, Delco, whoever it was) your question and gotten their take on it.

Any metal left untreated and exposed to air WILL corrode.

 
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01-22-03, 09:48 AM   #9  
Joe_F
You could have simply asked the maker of the battery (Exide, Delco, whoever it was) your question and gotten their take on it.

Any metal left untreated and exposed to air WILL corrode.

The way it was worded originally it just seemed like you picked up a replacement battery for a failed one.

In any event, the opinions have been logged and you have our .02 .

 
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01-22-03, 09:58 AM   #10  
Agreed on the all metals corrode, joe. I have no idea the nature or agressiveness of the corrosive properties of battery lead exposed to ambient air. My suspicion would be that it would be minor (but in the interest of maintaining the best condition of the battery, I would probably wrap it in plastic).

I agree that it's a strange way to go, but if the battery was essentially free (except for eventually having to buy the acid), might as well use it some time.

 
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01-22-03, 09:50 PM   #11  
I never used an automotive battery shipped dry, but Sears used to send me those dry batteries for use when I was contracted for their lawn equipment repair work. I never had any problems storing them...I guess some of them stayed on the shelf for a couple of years. They were always hot and ready as soon as I added acid. Whether or not their life span was shortened was unapparent to me, but they did last for some time in storage in the dry state. You should be OK. Just my 2sense.


"Who is John Galt?" - Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged)

God bless!

 
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01-24-03, 05:05 AM   #12  
Just out of curiosity I searched for "lead corrosion" and the few sites I checked on lead properties refer to lead as being pretty corrosion resistant (until you submerge it in acid, of course. LOL)

 
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01-26-03, 10:42 PM   #13  
trendar
If you do plan on storing it for a long time, make sure you haven't opened any of the caps; the motorcycle batteries that I've purchased came dry, and they appear to be shipped with a vacuum to minimize detrioration.

Also, lead acid batteries need to be maintained at full charge for longevity; keeping them off concrete doesn't really do anything, because the case does not conduct- it's more a factor of leaving them sitting anywhere without a maintenance charge, which can cause sulfation when they run down. Lead acid batteries are not happy when left discharged for any appreciable amount of time; they're not designed for deep discharge.

 
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