Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

91 honda civic


queenie76's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

01-24-03, 08:36 PM   #1  
queenie76
91 honda civic

hubby has a 91 honda civic ,1.5 l, 5 speed-- here's our situation. the timing belt broke on 12-24-02, he had it replaced. on 01-13-03 it came off,(did not break). our mechanic tells us that the engine is basically blown, clyinder heads, bent valve stems and the water pump too. my question is-if there was too much slack in the newly installed timing belt have caused this problem? the guy who originally replaced it says no, and our regular mechanic says yes.

 
Sponsored Links
bejay's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 2,538

01-24-03, 09:26 PM   #2  
if the timing belt has jumped it is possible it may have bent the valves and in rare cases may of cracked a piston also from the valve hitting the piston,
there is not much you can do but install another belt and run a compression test or leak down test on each cylinder to see if any damage has been done.

 
Joe_F's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

01-25-03, 05:24 AM   #3  
Joe_F
I agree with BeJay.

 
the_tow_guy's Avatar
Group Moderator

Join Date: Feb 2001
Posts: 11,475
FL

01-25-03, 01:46 PM   #4  
Just to add a quick thought - most mechanics won't just replace the belt on a known valve-bender, but it's a waste of time and money.

 
bejay's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 2,538

01-25-03, 05:02 PM   #5  
i have seen lots of interference engines that do not have any valve damage when a belt jumps or breaks and when you would think that valve damage would be almost unavoidable, i have also seen non interference engines that would bend the valves due to timing belt breaking on occasion, so i dont give interference or non interference much consideration other than to use care when installing a belt.
either way you have to remove timing covers whether you are replacing the belt or removing the head to replace bent valves you do not have to put it all back together to run a compression test or leak down test on average you spend an additional 1/2 hour of time determining if any valves or damaged.

 
michael van's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 2,345
TX

01-25-03, 06:45 PM   #6  
just an idea

Since Hondas are known to bend valves there is a tool called a borescope.we use these in the aircraft industry.What it is is a fiber optic device that lets you look inside something like a cylinder.I dont know if they use them in automotive but they work great.
They have a light on the end of them and can bend to any angle.They are made by olympus.

 
Joe_F's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

01-25-03, 07:57 PM   #7  
Joe_F
Was the water pump changed at the same time? If the pump goes and wipes the belt out with coolant, it could cause it to fail.

Also, were the tensioners changed at the same time? Worthy idea on a 12 year old car with probably many miles on it .

 
Search this Thread