Brake Rotors Roaring

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  #1  
Old 02-11-03, 07:46 PM
fireman07
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Question Brake Rotors Roaring

WHAT COULD CAUSE A ROARING SOUND TO COME FROM FRONT OF CAR, THIS IS A 97 MURCURY SABLE & JUST HAVE PUT NEW ROTORS /PADS ON FRONT JUST THREE WEEKS AGO.
THIS HAPPENS WHEN BRAKES ARE APLYED( THE ROARING SOUND).
 
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  #2  
Old 02-11-03, 08:42 PM
Joe_F
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Could be wasted wheel bearings/hub assembly.
 
  #3  
Old 02-17-03, 10:25 AM
fireman07
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Cool brakes roaring

THE GUY AT WHITES TIRE SERVICE SAYED THAT IT ALSO MIGHT BE ROTARS THAT IS WARPED, SAYED THAT THE ROTOR'S HAD A SLIGHT GROVE IN THEM , HE ALSO SAYED THAT THAT MIGH HAVE COME FROM NOT TURNNING THE ROTOR'S WHEN FIRST PUTTING THEM ON.
I HAVE ALSO BEEN TOLD THAT THERE IS THIS GUY THAT DRILLS ROTOR'S THAT HAS BEEN DOING THIS FOR A VERY LONG TIME.THE GUY THAT DRILLS THE ROTOR'S SAYES THAT IT WILL KEEP THE ROTOR'S COOL.
 
  #4  
Old 02-17-03, 02:17 PM
Joe_F
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If the wheel nuts were tightened with an air gun too tight, the new rotors will get wasted fast. Also, if the are cheap quality offshore replacements, they are trash and will warp in a jiffy.

Only high quality US or Canadian made replacements should be used if not Ford rotors. Also, they cannot be overtightened or else they will be ruined.

Kill the caps--no need to shout.
 
  #5  
Old 02-17-03, 11:21 PM
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I would highly suggest against the concept of creating home made "cross drilled" rotors. Cross drilled rotors are a high performance application that does result in cooler rotor surface. HOWEVER, a cross drilled rotor is designed specifically for that application, and they are designed to stand the pressure of the holes in the materials.

If you drill a stock rotor, You might have many problems, some including: Weakness resulting from loss of material in the rotor, cracking and chipping between drill, breakage of rotor in a serious braking incident, and increased susceptibility of warping due to less steel being in the rotors.

The car was designed for the stock rotors to be effecient for the design of the car. As Joe noted, a "good" american replacement of these rotors is all you need if they cannot be turned. Don't bother with any drilling, no matter what he says. How can you have structural integrity of an object when much of the mass is removed without successful re-engineering of the product?
 
  #6  
Old 02-18-03, 06:32 AM
Joe_F
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Thumbs up

Jeremy said it the best
 
  #7  
Old 02-18-03, 07:27 AM
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If you would like to learn more about brakes check out this site.
http://www.raybestos.com/usa/somelikeithot.htm
Have the rotors turned or replace them. Don't have them drilled, purchase pre-drilled rotors engineered specifically for your car(you really dont need them)and use a torque wrench to tighten the lug nuts. I too agree with all the posts here, as your brakes are there for everyone's safety.
 
  #8  
Old 02-18-03, 05:54 PM
fireman07
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Unhappy BRAKE ROTORS

THE REASON I MENTION ABOUT DRILL ROTORS IS BECAUSE I AM CONSTANTLY HAVING TO TURN &REPLACE THEM.
I HAVE HAD 5 DIFFRENT VEHICLE'S AND I HAVEN'T HAD THE PROBLEM THAT I HAVE HAD WITH THIS CAR, IM WONDERING IF BRAKE CAMS ARE COMPRESING TO MUCH TO CAUSE THS PROBLEM.
 
  #9  
Old 02-18-03, 08:16 PM
RKINGDAVE
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You should not have to turn new rotors before installing them!!!Does the roaring noise change in intensity when swerving the vehicle from side to side? If it does this is a classic indication of a wheel bearing, or in the case of your front wheel drive vehicle, .. axle bearing failure. If it is the bearing it will get progressively worse. I would strongly suggest you have it thoroughly checked by a mechanic before taking any lengthy trips. A "going bad" wheel/axle bearing will slowly get worse on short trips but a prolonged trip will allow the bearing tempature to rise to the point where it will go downhill rapidly.... even locking up onto the axle or spinning the outer bearing race in the steering knuckle, then locking up all together.... in other words.. the wheel stops turning, suddenly. Do you hear any roaring when swerving the vehicle side to side? Sounds like a bearing problem.... it is rare for brakes to cause a roaring sound, and if you can answer no to the swerving question, what brand and kind of brake pad did you install? Those cheap "lifetime wearout guarentee" pads often have an extremely high metal content in the material used to manufacture them are are much more likely to make brake noise
 
  #10  
Old 02-18-03, 09:48 PM
Joe_F
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No need to machine new rotors. Buy good quality Canadian or US made replacements, slap them on, tighten the wheels to the proper torque value and the problem is solved.

You cannot cross drill, nor should you cross drill a stock rotor. There is zero benefit to doing that and you will ruin a good rotor.

I own three performance cars with stock GM rotors, they all stop on the dime, every time.
 
  #11  
Old 02-19-03, 07:10 PM
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Every ford I have owned to date has has real SH&tty brakes. WHich means I have NEVER had a car with good brakes.

It might just be me, but I have the exact same problem. I wear through brakes like mad, and my rotors always warp on me every few months, no matter which ford I am in, whether it be the old school maverick, my 80's mustang gt, or my 94 Thunderbird, my experience is that Ford just never figured out the braking system.

If you are real intent on keeping this car, and having real good brakes, and are absolutely positive that the problem is not your driving habits, then I would turn to the after market.

I am not sure what year the Tauras SHO was discontinued, but I know that their should be a halfway decent world of after market parts that will bolt up to your car. You might be able to get bigger aftermarket cross drilled rotors with bigger calipers, etc. But this can be a very expensive solution--espescially for a non-performance car.

What I would do, one of two things. Trade the car in for something newer or different, or B, just get used to the warped rotors. Over the years, I have gotten used to the brake pedal bouncing on me every time I press the brake. Kinda lets me know the rotors are still there.

Oh yeah, check your brake pads, that "roaring" could very well be metal on metal with your brake pads.
 
  #12  
Old 02-20-03, 03:39 AM
Joe_F
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Jeremy:

My sister had the same car as you (1990) and after I did the brakes, there were no more warping problems.

Usually it's due to abuse, poor machining or overitghtening of the wheel studs .

A new set of rotors and proper torque (barring no other problems) should solve this quandary.
 
  #13  
Old 02-22-03, 12:58 AM
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ok. I will try the torque method next time I do brakes. I am always quick to yell at the car shops for using an impact to tighten lugs, but never think twice about wrenching them on myself by hand.

Having more than ample strength, I am sure I am over muscling the lugs, and this has likely been my problem for years, funny I didn't think this until now.
 
  #14  
Old 02-22-03, 09:59 AM
Joe_F
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Usually the hubless rotors (which most are today), are the worst for warping as they tend to be thinner.
 
  #15  
Old 02-24-03, 08:06 AM
short_circutz
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I agree with the statement about cheap "lifetime" brake pads. The high metallic composition will quickly wear out rotors. Are the rotors on your car vented? (braking surfaces are seperasted with a passage with fins)? If not, the non-vented rotors are really bad for warping if they are hot and get some water/snow hitting them while they are hot.

Even on a vehicle designed for semi-metallic brakes, I have always preferred to use organics if I am able to get them...they wear out faster, but the rotor/drum suffers from less wear and tear.
 
  #16  
Old 02-24-03, 12:09 PM
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Location: Long Island, NY
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You have to check the run out of the hub. You can replace or cut rotors(off the car) and continue with the same end result, vibration. all it take is one time to sap them down without torquing and the hub is not true.

Cutting on the car will take care of slight hub runout and result in vibration free braking(as long as lugs are torqued to spec)

Larry
 
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