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1990 Dodge Dakota fuel tank drop problem


Hirsch's Avatar
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03-10-03, 06:31 AM   #1  
1990 Dodge Dakota fuel tank drop problem

I have a 1990 Dodge Dakota pickup with a 3.9L 6cyl engine with automatic trans, and TBI injection. THe truck has a bad fuel pump, which is in the gas tank ( I could cheefully throttle the twinkie that dreamed up this idea) . One of the gas tank strap nuts will not come loose. I tired Liquid wrench penetrating oil, wd-40 and hitting the wrench with a hammer to try to get the nut loose. None of these methods have worked. Will battery acid eat the nut and is it safe to do this? I am at wits end right now. Any help will be vey much appreciated. Have a good one!!



 
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03-10-03, 06:56 AM   #2  
Joe_F
No. Cut the strap with a tin snip or other strong cutter and replace it and the hardware with a dealer part when you put it back together.

 
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03-10-03, 03:17 PM   #3  
Grab a few freinds and lift the bed off its faster and easier.Thats how i do trucks.

 
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03-11-03, 02:01 AM   #4  
Or you could just cut if off with cut off wheel, just make sure nothing get to hot and that there is no fumes or leaking gas.

 
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03-11-03, 05:39 AM   #5  
Joe_F
I'd agree, but chances are there is still fuel/vapors around the tank (because it's not out or drained yet), so there is danger with using a cutting tool (sparks) around the tank.

 
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03-11-03, 09:51 AM   #6  
cutting wheel question

Would it be safe to use a cutting wheel if all the hoses and filler neck are plugged and then taped shut?

 
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03-11-03, 09:55 AM   #7  
Is a cutting wheel the same thing as a die grinder? There actually isn't room to use that since I have to reach in between the driveshaft and muffler, so would it possible to use a hacksaw blade instead?
Have a good one

 
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03-11-03, 10:46 AM   #8  
Joe_F
Hirsh:

A die grinder is used for sanding/polishing, while a cutting wheel (what I call a "whiz wheel" is the air tool with the plastic guard and hardened cutting wheel.

Two different animals.

 
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03-11-03, 11:16 AM   #9  
No access to air tools. Is it safe to use a hacksaw blade?

Is it safe to use a hacksaw blade to do this since I have no access to air tools if the hoses and filler neck have rags stuffed partialy in and taped?

 
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03-12-03, 01:16 AM   #10  
Hacksaw should do it. If you have taken the filler hose off already tape the opening with duct tape to prevent fumes from leaking If you are really concerned about it siphon the gas out, then get dry ice and drop it down the filler neck, the C02 in the dry ice gas displaces the gas vapors. Not enough to weld on the tank but enough to make it safe to cut around. If welding or cutting on the tank most people would have to fill it with argon or some other inert gas and H20. Contrary to popular belief you can even weld on a full tank, but it requires extreme skill. Itís the same technique use to make hot taps on a running gas pipeline. If you are not able to get to the part with a hacksaw you can rent a small air compressor and a very small cut off wheel at lot of home improvement stores or industrial rental store. I have a cutoff/grinder that is about the size of a deck of stick of deodorant so you should be able to find one small enough to fit.

 
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03-12-03, 03:28 AM   #11  
Joe_F
Agree with Weld.

You can rent a compressor, but I would suggest you add it to your arsenal of items to buy if you are going to get involved in auto repair.

 
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03-12-03, 04:18 AM   #12  
Thank you, but not planning to do this full time

Thank you for the tip about the air compressor. I'm just trying to get my truck back on the road so I can be employed again, since I do not have the patience to work on cars full time.

 
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03-12-03, 09:08 AM   #13  
Joe_F
I don't work on 'em full time and I have a compressor .

 
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03-13-03, 06:14 AM   #14  
Thank you for advice, 1 more question

I want to thank all of those who responded for the advice on this problem. I got the tank out last night. I also took out the fuel pump. Is the pump from the tank meant to come apart to put a new pump in? I am asking this because the pump that I got to replace the original with is a lot smaller. I am afraid of breaking the original setup to get at the part that I bought. Is there a way to take the pump out of the housing without breaking it?

Again, thank you much

 
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03-13-03, 07:56 AM   #15  
Joe_F
Some aftermarket pumps are made to replace the pump inside the fuel module. Most times on the module style pumps, the OEM services the whole module assembly, sometimes even with the fuel gauge sender attached, sometimes not (depends on the application).

My advice to you is to go to the Chrysler dealer and buy the part. You will get the most updated part # which will also be complete and exact for the vehicle. Chrysler probably has made some updates against the original unit and the aftermarket ones may not be up to snuff.

Don't chince to save a few bucks---you'll do this job twice.

 
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03-14-03, 01:15 AM   #16  
I would be careful with any replacement part that dose not look exactly like the original. I agree with Joe, go the Chrysler parts house and get the correct part from them.

 
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03-14-03, 05:58 AM   #17  
THe part matches, why do I need a full tank?

THe part matched exactly, but why do you need a full tank of gas before starting the vehicle? The truck does have gas, but not a full tank like the instructions recommend.

 
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03-14-03, 07:45 AM   #18  
Joe_F
They probably want to have the pump completely submerged into fuel so it doesn't run dry (which might ruin it) as well as to prime it.

Just fill it as much as you can.

 
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03-14-03, 07:54 AM   #19  
thank you much,

thank you much had no clue about that

 
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03-14-03, 11:09 AM   #20  
Re: THe part matches, why do I need a full tank?

Originally posted by Hirsch
THe part matched exactly, but why do you need a full tank of gas before starting the vehicle? The truck does have gas, but not a full tank like the instructions recommend.
Also electric fuel pumps use the fuel to cool with. The fuller you keep your fuel tank the longer the pump will last. Don't forget to change the filter/strainer on the fuel pump and the inline fuel filter.

 
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03-14-03, 11:54 AM   #21  
thank you

have new filter strainer. had to get it for a valid warranty. Glad I did. The original strainer is black as pavement. Just changed the inline fuel filter 500 miles ago since I though that was why the truck was running rough instead of the pump going bad. Had no idea the gas cooled the pump.

 
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