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78 town car - worth the buy?


joatmon's Avatar
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04-05-03, 12:43 PM   #1  
78 town car - worth the buy?

My dad just gave me a lead on a 78 town car, 79k miles, leather seats, vinyl top, body is immaculate no dents, no rust, loaded with options. the guy is asking for 1500. I'm thinking I could probably give him 1200 cash.

I'm looking for peoples opinions. is this a good buy?

I'm going to see this car for myself next weekend.

 
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04-05-03, 02:44 PM   #2  
Joe_F
If you like these cars, it sounds like something worth looking at. They are large barges.

Fords of this vintage suffer from poor quality, terrible carburetion, bad gas mileage, lackluster performance, and even poorer resale value unless they are well optioned and mint. The GM's of this vintage were far superior in every way.

An old car like this will require a lot of upkeep and thorough repair (no matter what the brand), so factor that into your budget.

 
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04-05-03, 03:15 PM   #3  
darrell McCoy
seen some of these old boats run for what seemed for ever, but when you start repairing, it is endless. It can get into your dinner bucket big time. Uphill, downhill, across country. Gas hogs.

 
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04-07-03, 06:53 PM   #4  
Stay away from ANY and ALL cars between the years of 1975-1984 or so.( there are one or two exceptions.

regardless of the manufacturer, emissions became such a nightmare that once these cars failed smog, or started braking down, they quickly became endless money pits. This is not to mention the lousy power out-put. Pretty much every american smallblock v8 was only putting out 130 horses or so, very slow.

I would stick with the 85/86 up ford products (gm was behind the ball with adapting a lot of cars to efi in the late 80's ) or 90 up GM's should be ok.

 
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04-08-03, 03:54 AM   #5  
Joe_F
Lol. I respectfully disagree . I own cars all in the range of "to avoid" and they are fine cars. Finer than most out there. LOL.

GM V8's were solid in any year. Ford was WAY behind in emission technology and it showed with the complexity of their emission systems, lack of performance, and mostly, in sales .

A 1979 GM car is much more simple emission wise than a Ford of that era, and from offerings from both later on. It doesn't get any easier for the DIY guy than a 70's GM. Parts are easy to get to, cheap and everything is straight forward on it for the most part.

All of my cars pass the NYS inspection program with ease. Any well maintained car should fly right through any state's program if it's in good shape.

I like to chuckle with California being strict on emissions----there are few alternatives with GOOD mass transit there. LOL.

Jeremy: Ford was late in the game getting into EFI. GM had them beat a long time ago. Cadillacs had fuel injection as far back as 1975 on a "mass" scale. Even in 1982, the small X and A body cars had fuel injection, Ford's offerings were carbureted (and terrible) .

As for V8's, it depends on what we are talking about


Last edited by Joe_F; 04-08-03 at 09:00 AM.
 
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04-08-03, 12:51 PM   #6  
In the area of fuel injection, I was referring mostly to the camaro/firebird and chevy trucks. (since most of my info comes from my hobby with the v8 pony car type vehicles)

The camaro/firebird and Truck (305/350's) were running throttlebody injection LONG after Ford went to multiport injection. the mustangs went multiport in 86, the crown vic in 87, etc. The multiport injection combined with the early computers in my opionion is was the beginning of what I and some others call the second muscle car revolution. I have always believed that the 86 mustang played a huge part(while not alone) in bringing about this second generation of modded american cars. I don't know too much about emissions equip on cars, but a maintained ford 5.0 fi will go 250-300k miles easy with minimal break down.

 
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04-08-03, 01:10 PM   #7  
Joe_F
Except that Ford didn't make or design their fuel injection system, Bosch did .

GM's Multec is of their own design (ball and seat) which doesn't clog. Bosch's pintle design DOES and needs to be cleaned .

The F car had the Mustang beat with fuel injection. 1982 on the F car, 1984 on the GT350 (and that was a limited run ).

The F car went MFI in 1985, (the 5.0 vin F motor) the same year the Mustang was still TBI or carbureted. LOL.

Sure, the Mustang is a good contender in the pack, but hardly the originator.

Ford's fuel controls have always been second rate to GM's .

 
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04-10-03, 08:18 AM   #8  
Dang Joe.. you know your stuff!

A '78 with 79k miles on it?

If you are a fan of big ol' tanks (like I am) and you have the money, get it.

If this is going to be your everyday transportation, then I'd suggest taking your $1200 elsewhere. This is going to guzzle the gas.

All of these suggestions are great. If you love old ('78 = old *shudder*) cars, then this sounds like it's a gem (no rust.. relatively low miles).

Check the frame!

 
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04-10-03, 08:52 AM   #9  
Joe_F
Lol. Thanks Jason.

BTW: My 1980 Turbo T/A has 26k original, and my 1979 10th Anniversary has 57k original (having only been driven 7 k miles in 15 years). Most of the mileage came from the first owner from 1980 to 1987.

Yep, 79k is low mileage for an oldie like that.

 
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