68 Mustang

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  #1  
Old 04-22-03, 03:40 PM
orange68stang
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Talking 68 Mustang

Im might buy this orange 68 Mustang coupe. It has a 302 engine and has an automatic transmission but is set up for a stick. It has about 84,000 miles on it. I was wondering what I should do to tune it up . I was thinking just replacing worn belts, new air filter, topping off fluids, replacing old gaskets, and that sort of stuff. I have a limited knowledge of engines though. I only know about small 2-strokes (i.e. weed wacker engines).
Thanks, Aaron
 
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  #2  
Old 04-22-03, 04:18 PM
Joe_F
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Depends on what your goal is.

Do you want a driver or a mint show queen? A beater or a beauty? Every nut and bolt perfect, or whatever the hardware store supplies will do?

What's the asking price? What is your budget? Is the vehicle original?

etc, etc, etc, etc. etc.

My experience with old cars like this is that whatever you think it needs double it. It's usually worse than you think.
 
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Old 04-22-03, 07:35 PM
rayone1
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68'tang

muscle cars are hard to value. you have to know what the car is worth when you finish it,compared to how much time and money you can put in it. you need to have at least basic understanding of every aspect of a car,motor,trans suspension,body and interior if you want to break even, that is unless you have money growing on the trees in your back yard. i have been restoring cars (mostly my own) for around 15 yrs. i am not pro but i have had some killer cars. i have allways at least broke even, but my average is selling a car for three times what i gave for it. you have to pay someone to do anything you can not do yourself, so you need to know the basics. the less you know about a car the more it will cost you to fix it. it can be a nightmare if you get over your head. i guess it depends on how bad you want it.
 
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Old 04-22-03, 11:20 PM
MsChip
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We have 68 Mustang Convertible with a 302.

A shop manual is an invaluable reference book, IMO, for doing work on classic cars. There are a large number of part retailers who sell reprints of the original Ford shop manual for a '68 Mustang. We found one about 10 years ago in a Hemmings Motor News ad but I've seen the same advertised at a number of part's retailers on the web who sell Mustang parts.
 
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Old 04-23-03, 04:10 AM
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Important on any muscle car is to check the frame from front to back for rusting through. Look closely at where the rear springs mount to the frame. Also check under the trunk carpet, shock towers, and floor boards. If this car is low priced there is probly some hidden secrets. Quality Mustangs don't come cheap.
 
  #6  
Old 04-23-03, 05:08 AM
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Joe's "double your estimate" advice is good. Also, you can pretty much plan on getting a fraction of what you invest in it back out of it in the event you sell it (unless you're buying a perfectly preserved example and plan to store it in a climate-controlled environment). With collector-type cars, you have to buy them because you like them - not as investments. For the most part, they are historically horrible investments. I've been lucky enough to break even when selling some of my "investments".

Mustangs in particular are known to be rust buckets. Look it over very carefully. Body work - whether new or redoing old bodywork - is VERY expensive if done right.

I'm the type of person that believes a car should be driven. Buy it, drive it, enjoy it. There will be plenty of trailer-queens around for people to stand around and look at in the future. I've modified my Grand National to the point where many purists would cringe, but I love to drive it around on a nice day (mostly on the way to the race track . Plus, people really seem to enjoy seeing classics out there on the road.

Good luck,
Jim
 
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Old 04-23-03, 05:40 AM
Joe_F
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That is very true. To each his/her own on modifications and what not.

I just don't alter mint or rare originals .
 
  #8  
Old 04-23-03, 08:41 AM
MsChip
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<b>Rust?</b> Ain't that the truth. *LOL*

We had to replace the tork boxes, inner rocker panels on both sides, full (front & rear) floor pans and some areas around the front springs in the engine compartment. It ended up costing us around $3 Grand for the labor to have a local mustang shop cut out rust and weld all new metal in these areas. One thing nice about restoring a classic Mustang is that molded sheet metal parts are available.
 
  #9  
Old 04-23-03, 10:29 AM
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The mustang has quite a few after market suppliers of parts; you should not have much problem finding anything you need. I think cars and trucks of this age are a “project” meaning you do the work yourself. After you to your own work you then "own" the car. And with just about any “project” its is never done. I agree that you most likely wont make any money on it. If that is why you are dong it I think you would be better off looking for other investments. There is only one right way to restore/build up that car, that is how YOU want to. Don’t let any one tell you that is not right, so long as you are building a car you can enjoy for years to come.
 
  #10  
Old 04-24-03, 04:27 AM
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WeldGod is exactly right. So when you decide to put that 429 Boss in there just do it and rip the doors off all those 4cyl rice rockets.
 
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