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'90 Plymouth Voyager - intermittent problem


CMil's Avatar
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06-21-03, 11:22 PM   #1  
'90 Plymouth Voyager - intermittent problem

I have a 1990 Plymouth Grand Voyager with the 3.3l EFI v-6 and overdrive (4-speed) automatic. The last couple of weeks, it's started doing the strangest thing. Cold start is fine, and the van runs very well until the engine gets warm. Then, sometimes(not always), it seems to grow a "dead spot" in the gas pedal travel, an area where the engine takes a long time to respond to additional throttle opening. This is really a pain ( not to mention probably dangerous) when leaving traffic lights or trying to get on the freeway. When this happens, the pedal seems to still behave properly at the extreme ends, from idle to about 1/4 throttle and from about 3/4 to full throttle. So I can drive either 25 mph or less OR 75 mph or more! I was exploring while the engine was really warm and found the throtle position sensor to be VERY warm. It occured to me that it was positioned in the flow of air through the radiator, plus it's almost directly above the front-to-rear exhaust crossover pipe. I fashioned a crude heat shield out of aluminum foil for the sensor and drove the van 450 miles earlier today without a single hiccup. Could the TPS be breaking down with heat, "healing" itself when the engine cools off? Is there somewhere else I should look instead or also? Any/all ideas would be welcome! Thanks - Chris

 
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06-22-03, 06:19 AM   #2  
Joe_F
A bad TPS will give dead spots in the throttle range, sure. It can be checked with a digital meter or a scanner.

Have a look in autolibrary.org for the spec. If it fails the test, get a new one from any parts store, shouldn't be expensive at all and should be in stock there.

 
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