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how to change out an Alternator


HelPlot53's Avatar
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07-31-03, 09:05 AM   #1  
HelPlot53
how to change out an Alternator

I am trying to save my self some money by changing out my alternator myself. I have a 1988 Ford Escort. And I have gotten 2 bolts off but I can't seem to see what I have to do yet. The Alternator will not come out. Is there something that I am missing. I need someones help. I have never done this before.

 
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Joe_F's Avatar
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07-31-03, 09:38 AM   #2  
Joe_F
Check autolibrary.org in my signature file below for R&R help.

I suggest you put a Motorcraft branded alternator in there for longest life as parts store alternators vary WIDELY in rebuild quality.

Any Ford or Motorcraft dealer/jobber can order the necessary part.

 
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07-31-03, 09:43 AM   #3  
You need to disconnect the negative battery cable before you go any further. There should be 2 or 3 wires on the alternator that need to be disconnected. The fan belt needs to be loosened and if it hasn't been changed in a while change it. There should be 2 bolts holding the alternator on. you need to take off the bolt that is on the slide bracket and 1 holing the alternator on. If your trying to save money invest in a Chiltons or Haynes manual, it will pay for itself many times over.

 
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07-31-03, 09:59 AM   #4  
Joe_F
Skip the Chilton or Haynes manuals, they are table props.

The link I sent is the SAME information you'll find in a Chilton manual and is free. If that doesn't have it, spend the dough for a factory manual.

Chances are if one of the aftermarket manuals skips it, they all do.

 
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07-31-03, 01:50 PM   #5  
If this person doesn't have a factory service manual as of yet it would be a whole lot easier for them to walk into a parts store and get a Haynes or Chiltons.


Last edited by twelvepole; 08-04-03 at 05:58 PM.
 
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07-31-03, 03:36 PM   #6  
Joe_F
EW:

Let's take a look at this.

1) No need for the poster to buy a Chilton or a Haynes because:

a) Both are really useless for anything more than the basics.
b) Both tend to leave out a lot.
c) Why should the poster go out and spend $15 on a Chilton when I've provided the SAME information free with the autolibrary.org link? (Autolibrary IS the Chilton manual you buy in the parts store!)

2) Taking 1c into account and that same $15, I bought the ORIGINAL OEM book for my Chevy Cavalier (same comparable car/price/type of book as would be for this Escort). Paid on Ebay with Paypal, one click and the book showed up in four days. Not bad o fr

a) The OEM manual if you find them used are as cheap if not cheaper than the aftermarket books, if you shop wisely. I've yet to pay more than $70 a set of books for ANY of my cars. I think the most I paid was $66.00 with postage for my Pontiac books, and I got three of 'em for that price. LOL

b) The factory manual is better hands down and costs less without frustration, lack of detail or correct information. I have better things to do than scratch my head. LOL.

 
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07-31-03, 04:54 PM   #7  
HelPlot53
OK the alternator is in

I went back out and I got it done. At the time when I wrote, I had the battery on a charger and everything disconnected. I just could not figure out how in the world to get the alternator out.
I usually have someone here to talk me though it and I did not have that this time.
Thanks guys


Last edited by twelvepole; 08-04-03 at 06:00 PM.
 
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07-31-03, 05:19 PM   #8  
knuckles
stop, you're killing me!

This post was edited because it added nothing to the topic. Please stick to the topic.


Last edited by twelvepole; 08-04-03 at 06:09 PM.
 
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07-31-03, 06:17 PM   #9  
HelPlot53
This post was edited because it added nothing to the topic. Please stick to the topic.


Last edited by twelvepole; 08-04-03 at 06:11 PM.
 
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07-31-03, 08:47 PM   #10  
knuckles
This post was edited because it added nothing to the topic. Please stick to the topic.


Last edited by twelvepole; 08-04-03 at 06:13 PM.
 
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08-01-03, 03:37 AM   #11  
Joe_F
This post was edited because it added nothing to the topic. Please stick to the topic.


Last edited by twelvepole; 08-04-03 at 06:19 PM.
 
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08-01-03, 09:07 AM   #12  
Joe, you're absolutely right that you can get the information free on the net and it's indeed very good information. The question is, what happens when you need to tighten a belt on the road.
I usually carry Haynes, Chiltons and the factory service manuals in my vehicles. Chiltons and Haynes are very basic and I figured basic is better in this case. My Dodge factory service manual has 32 pages on the alternator and voltage regulator which I think is overwhelming for a novice. I also believe that if this person didn;t have a manual it would be easy to walk into Napa or Autozone and just pick it up.


Last edited by twelvepole; 08-04-03 at 06:21 PM.
 
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08-01-03, 09:10 AM   #13  
Joe_F
Tough to say---no details specified.

On the road, I have towing insurance. I think it's $5.00 yearly through Geico. I'd rather have it towed where I can work on it rather than guess on the side of the road with cars whizzing by at 70 mph .

 
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