Correct pressure for Acura A/C

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  #1  
Old 08-07-03, 07:55 PM
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Correct pressure for Acura A/C

Can someone tell me the correct pressure readings for a 1994 Acura Integra RS with 134a at 85F and around 90% humidity. I have the manual but I'm either reading it wrong or the high pressure side should be over 300psi, is that correct?
 
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  #2  
Old 08-07-03, 08:14 PM
Joe_F
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Which manual are you using? What A/C tools do you have available to you beyond the gauge set?

Is the cooling fan working properly? How's the cooling system? What service has been done to the AC system prior to this repair and now?
 
  #3  
Old 08-08-03, 05:50 AM
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I have the helms service manual, and a good guage set and a robinair vacuum pump. I am repairing a small leak and replacing the drier.
 
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Old 08-08-03, 05:58 AM
Joe_F
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If the manual doesn't have what pressures you should be seeing on the gauges (You are using R134A gauges, and not R12 ones, right???), then I'm surprised. That's a crappy manual in such case.

Reread the charging procedure carefully in the Acura manual to make sure you are not missing something.

I know all of the GM manuals I have for my vehicles have excellent detail on A/C charging.
 
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Old 08-08-03, 08:06 AM
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I haven't started yet I'm just trying to figure out the chart.
 
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Old 08-08-03, 09:07 AM
Joe_F
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You'll also need a good pyrometer/thermometer to check outlet pressure.

The chart I have from Alldata shows some delivery pressures being up to 430 PSI.

What was the original cause of failure?
 
  #7  
Old 08-08-03, 04:18 PM
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Yes a 134 system will run over 300 psi on that type of day.How is the a/c cooling?I prefer to pull a vacuum and then charge with the proper amount of refrigerant.
 
  #8  
Old 08-09-03, 09:53 AM
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The A/C cools fine for a couple of weeks until the pressure drops from the freon leak. 2 12oz cans are a perfect refill but I have a 30lb cylinder that I hate to waste.
 
  #9  
Old 08-09-03, 12:20 PM
Joe_F
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Arrow

Meaning you must find and correct the leak . That is why a good electronic leak detector is needed as I originally suggested/asked.
 
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Old 08-09-03, 05:55 PM
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save your money on the electronic leak detector, next time you have no freon in the system, add some ultraviolet dye, then charge as normal, then when it is low again, search around with an ultraviolet light, the leak will jump right out at you.
 
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Old 08-09-03, 07:21 PM
Joe_F
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Assuming it's big enough, yes.

I don't want that goo all over my engine compartment though, hence the suggestion for the electronic detector (which Autozone may even rent you free of charge---another option).
 
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Old 08-09-03, 07:30 PM
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i own an electronic leak detector, i haven't touched it in three years.

you will never see dye without the ultraviolet light, it is not gooey, the dye brightly shows ALL leaks---no matter how small, if it is leaking out in a few weeks---it's a big leak! there are no false positive 'beeps' with the dye too, as a plastic dashboard will give.


it's what works in the 'field' everyday.
 
  #13  
Old 08-09-03, 09:35 PM
Joe_F
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Just looked at the Cavalier manual and they suggest an electronic leak detector...that's back in 1989....

The trick is to get a GOOD one which is sensitive to just about any leak you can find.

Also, if the system won't hold vacuum with a vacuum pump, there's a good clue there too .

Depends on what you like I guess.
 
  #14  
Old 08-10-03, 10:30 AM
Dan Meyer
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Hey JoeF, I am agreeing with you again. I must be getting old
An electronic leak detector is by far the best. But is expensive for a one or two time DIY

Ultra violet is cheaper. But IT WILL NOT DETECT very small leaks.

I have a TIF and it is very good

Further, unless you have a very good, strong light, the dye is very hard if not impossible to see - especially very small leaks.

Cheap pocket lights or even cheap hand helds are not bright enought to be of much value . But again, if the leak is big enough, I suppose any ultra violet will work.

My opinion
 
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Old 08-10-03, 12:44 PM
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i don't believe dyes were as good or mainstream in 1989 when the manual was printed, back then it was a leak detector or nothing
 
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Old 08-10-03, 12:55 PM
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In 1989 some people were still using the propane method, which to me is the best of all, but is now outlawed. A leak couldn't hide from those things. I have a snap-on leak detector, supposed to be very sensitive and capable of testing r12 and 134a, but it gives false alarms under several circumstances. It works when you put it on a leak, but it goes off in so many other places that you don't know when to believe it or not.
 
  #17  
Old 08-10-03, 02:16 PM
Joe_F
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A telltale sign of a leak is an oily/blackened connection/area.

That means refrigerant oil has leaked out, and should be a good clue what's going on.

I'm sure the Snap On item is made by someone else, so it's probably heavily overrated. I forget what brand I have, it's made in the USA though. Works pretty good.
 
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