Mike in NJ

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Old 08-11-03, 07:28 PM
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Mike in NJ

Mike...... I gotta give you kudos my friend. The other day you and I replied on a post about replacing the spark plugs on a Chrysler Minivan with the 3.3/3.8. You said it could be done without removing the intake plenum. I have never personally done one of these, but when I worked at Chrysler the guys there said that was the only way. Well, one came into the shop today and I decided to put your method to the test. It seems it worked real well. My lil helper got to do the dirty work with my instructions. hehehe... But it worked like a charm. Thanks for that Mike.
Billy

Thanks, I learned something... Thats always a good thing.
 
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Old 08-12-03, 12:12 AM
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glad i could help, yes the double-swivel is the (expensive)key.

how many burns are on his forearms, mine are finally healing from my last impatient tune-up.
 
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Old 08-12-03, 12:25 AM
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Hehe...burns on the arm reminds me of doing that same job. I finally bought a glove/arm protector from the snap-on truck for that purpose. It is some kind of fabric that protects your hands and arms from extremely hot surfaces. I can't remember what it is called, but it wasn't terribly expensive. Still a tight squeeze to do it, but a lot easier than removing the plenum.
 
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Old 08-12-03, 03:28 AM
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Mechanic's Glove or something like that .

I think those would come in handy for a car with headers (whew, hot!) LOL.

I do my best to wear work gloves when I work on cars and stuff and use hand cream on a regular basis. Things can REALLY take their toll on your hands!
 
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Old 08-12-03, 04:05 AM
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Where can I find these instuctions? Does this go for a 93' T&C ?
 
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Old 08-12-03, 04:18 AM
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Mike..... The funny thing is, we didnt use a double swivel. He used a regular spark plug socket. He got the number 1 plug from behind the alternator and the numbers 3 and 5 from underneath. It was real easy. I always thought it should be possible, cause I had done the tensioner on those (common Chrysler failure item here, LOL).
I think the real expedient key was that we put our big fan on it and let it cool way down and worked on some of the other items on the service while it was doing so.

Mattison.... Depends on what engine you have in the 93 I would suppose.

Cheese.... it is called Nomex (not exactly sure of the spelling here) Those work great until you get them saturated in oil... YUCK!! LOL

I normally only use gloves when im doing tire rotations, or something that doesnt require detailed work or with small tools or bolts. I have been working on cars for 20+ years and with the exception of all of the scars (not all auto related) my hands are fine, and I switch up on the hand cleaners on a regular basis and wash them probably 15 times a day. I know some folks have more tender skin, so thats just me.
Billy
 
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Old 08-12-03, 04:23 AM
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I'm 99% sure it's 3.3l
 
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Old 08-12-03, 06:45 AM
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(Closes the drawer putting the hand cream away...lol).

True, it depends. Sometimes you have to take off your gloves because you can't get a bolt started or you have to reach up there. But they do protect your hands. I use the brown jersey type gloves---they work well for most jobs.

I find they prevent/minimize cuts and abrasions you get from working around sharp metal, glass and other hazards. They also help.

Sometimes I do things at work (rebuild an alternator, clean something in the SafeTclean tank) which would otherwise wipe out my clothes .

What I normally do is grab a lab coat or don the protective gear for the SafeTClean setup.

I look like I work for NYC Hazmat's unit with the gloves, mask and apron. LOL!
 
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Old 08-12-03, 07:03 PM
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OOOOOHHHHHH........ WIDE OPEN...... but I digress.
 
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Old 08-12-03, 07:06 PM
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Yup.. Back plugs from underneath..Saves LOTS of time..My arm protectors have kevlar in 'em.. It is kinda funny to see the look on a customer's face when you put them on, put on the gloves, strap 'em on tight, and pull down the sleeves..in 95 degree heat.. LOL!
Billy- You get a helper??? Sheeeshhh I get to do ALL the HELPING! LOL.. got a bunch of young guys who are still figuring out which end of a screw driver goes where...Bet my name gets called 60-70 times a day..(no joke there..) So I come here to relax......
 
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Old 08-12-03, 07:12 PM
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Msargent.... Wells hes not really a helper... but I dont know what to call him.... hes at best a C guy. He can do LOF, plugs and a few other easy things, but I try to stay on top when he gets something big since I am the shop foreman. I know what you mean about getting your name called all day long. My manager calls me more than anyone else. I have to look at cars, look up labor, explain stuff to customers, move cars in and out of the oil change lane.... Geez..........
Billy
 
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Old 08-12-03, 07:26 PM
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Hey, Billy!! (thought I'd add 1 more to todays total.. LOL!)

Seriously, you come across any more time saving tips..Post 'em.. cause as you know, time is money in our business!!
 
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Old 08-12-03, 08:14 PM
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If I'm reading this correctly, you guys are removing spark plugs from hot engines. If the engine is not cold, I won't remove the plugs. With most of the alloys used in today's cylinder heads, you run the risk of of removing the threads along with the plugs. Be careful.
 
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Old 08-12-03, 09:51 PM
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grandspan--when that happens, it will be the first time for me. not to contradict what you are saying, as i was taught that too, but it just doesn't happen. if i waited for the engine to cool to do every tune-up, i'd be (more) broke. i usually drive it with a scan tool hooked up until i find the cylinder that's misfiring, then switch various plugs and wires until i make the misfire move---all while the engine is red hot. so far, so good.

ever seen a 'plug check' during winston cup qualifying, you will not get a hotter aluminum head than that, and usually the plugs are out and scrutinized within two to three minutes.


if it works for you, keep doing it, i never argue with success!!
 
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Old 08-12-03, 10:54 PM
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msargent and all---huge time saver tip here, if you ever have the misfortune to remove a trans in a 98 to newer dakota/durango 4X4, let me know, it'll save you at least two hours of grief!!
 
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Old 08-13-03, 03:42 AM
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Solution to spark plug problem:

Buy cars with iron heads. LOL.

I've seen plugs in all different ways being crossthreaded and never once did they booger the threads up like that .
 
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