Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

Special Tools


BA-35's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

09-27-03, 04:25 PM   #1  
BA-35
Special Tools

My 97 Honda Accord (5spd) is due to get a new timing belt. I was looking at the service manual instructions and see that special tools are needed (Holder Handle & Holder Attachment). Are these tools available to the general public for rental or purchase?

 
Sponsored Links
billys68ss's Avatar
Member

Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 1,459
WV

09-27-03, 09:27 PM   #2  
The manual will show you tools that the dealership has that aids them in the repairs. Most dealer exclusive tools are available on the aftermarket tool market, but can be quite expensive. I dont usually use any special tools when doing timing belts unless absolutely necessary. It does make the job easier and much more accurate, but I dont think anything special is particularly necessary on your vehicle. You should take precaution and check and recheck and mark everything that moves before you remove the T-belt. Good Luck.
Hope this helps ya,
Billy

 
Joe_F's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

09-28-03, 02:49 AM   #3  
Joe_F
It depends on the tool.

GM quotes a "J" tool for everything in the shop manual: Case in point, the lock plate hold down tool for the steering column.

Go to Sears and you'll find one in the Craftsman display for probably half what the others charge. That is because the patent on that tool from Kent Moore has likely expired and K-D (who makes it for Craftsman) picked it up and makes it now, as well as other companies.

Sometimes the tool is the ONLY way to do it. In such case, Autozone can rent some specialty tools, so check with them.

 
Hirsch's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation

Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 167

09-28-03, 08:25 AM   #4  
According to the Autozone website, you can borrow the tools with a refundable deposit when you return the tool.

 
BA-35's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

09-28-03, 02:40 PM   #5  
BA-35
No luck at the Autozone or Craftsman websites, but I did find a site that would sell me the tool for about $70 (etoolcart.com). I'm beginning to wonder if it's really worth it to do it myself.

Thanks for the help everyone!

(Hey Hirsch, are you a Bruins fan by chance?)

 
Joe_F's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

09-28-03, 03:02 PM   #6  
Joe_F
Depends on how many times you will use this tool again, really.

It is always worth it doing it yourself, but you have to pay a little if you want to play. Mechanics update their tools annually at minimum .

 
billys68ss's Avatar
Member

Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 1,459
WV

09-28-03, 03:53 PM   #7  
Just a little reality check! Most mechanics, especially starting out spend alot of money on tools. I have been a mechanic for alot of years and since I have begun working for someone else turning wrenches I have spent way more than I ever did when I was on my own. Usually this goes the other way, but I didnt maintain alot of specialty tools when I ran my own business. If I didnt have it, I didnt need it was my motto then. This year alone I have spent well over $5000 on tools, mostly specialty stuff. And that is not including my toolbox. Theres no telling what the final tally will be since we still have 3 months left of the year, but I am keeping a running total. So a $70.00 tool is small potatoes. One of my tool truck payments is more than that per WEEK!!! LOL
Have fun and dont worry about what it costs.
Good Luck with your classes and your endeavors,
Billy

 
BA-35's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

09-28-03, 04:56 PM   #8  
BA-35
Five Grand! Ouch!

OK, now I feel a little silly whining about $70. And you guys are right; if I want to strut around the office Monday morning bragging about how I changed my own timing belt, well then, I have to pony-up for the tools. (Oh, and there will be lots of bragging!! After all, I'm not a professional mechanic, and most of my friends don't know the difference between OEM and REM.)

So Billy, after spending that much money, you must have a lot of tools. I was wondering if I could borrow... (just kidding)

 
Joe_F's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

09-29-03, 08:24 AM   #9  
Joe_F
Let me give you a perspective:

I had called on an ad for tools in the newspaper yesterday. Turns out the guy lives 5 blocks from me so I headed over there, since I missed the swapmeet due to rain this weekend in the NYC area

The guy wanted $1000 for everything and frankly, some of the stuff was outdated and not of good quality. He had Taiwan, SnapOn, Craftsman (I don't think I've ever seen a toolbox without SOME Craftsman as much as professional guys snub their nose at it....lol), SK and various others.

For what he had, that was steep.

He had some good stuff and I offered him a pretty good deal (from my end), and he said, "Ummm, I'll think about it". Betcha he calls back to accept my offer. And I will probably buy more from him if he is receptive .

Used tools don't nearly gain a good market in many places because as I was showing this guy a brand new tech starting out can buy a $1000 setup from Sears (box and all) and have a good range of stuff to get started. Throw in a lifetime warranty and close availability of items and that's not a bad deal.

Also, many of the tool companies making for Sears are making some of the pro tools too. K-D and others are supplying Sears and it's getting blurred as to who is who.

Go to Lowes and you'll find Kobalt which is made by SnapOn. Seems like good quality. Sears Craftsman is Stanley/K-D Danaher and others.

Main thing: Stick with stuff made in the good 'ol USA. I have never been let down by anything that has been made here, and it's far superior to the imported stuff, bar none.

Money wise, I probably spend 1/4 of what Billy has done, maybe a 1/10th, but I scout around for used items at garage sales, swapmeets, Ebay and the like. I also don't turn wrenches for a living, so it's a bit different to compare.

However, tools are a good personal investment. I never quibble about the price of them, I simply shop smart .

Good luck...

 
billys68ss's Avatar
Member

Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 1,459
WV

09-29-03, 03:29 PM   #10  
The $5000 I have spent so far this year doesnt include the $2000+ I spent last year plus the Snap On tool box (another $5000) and what I already had from the years past. Tools are a big investment, especially for the professional mechanic. I have bought quite a few tools on ebay and at the bargain stores if I know the quality is there. I am kinda skeptical about buying used tools, especially if it isnt Craftsman, Snap On or the like where I know I can get a replacement easily enough. Almost all of my hand tools (98%) are Craftsman. My specialty tools are various makes. I ONLY buy USA made tools.
Billy

 
Joe_F's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

09-29-03, 05:35 PM   #11  
Joe_F
I have mixed stuff, but mostly in complete sets. I'd say the same percentage Craftsman, with some SnapOn, MAC, Proto, and SK in there too.

Whatever I've BOUGHT has been Craftsman, but whatever I have inherited has been the other US brands. Some stuff belonged to relatives (now gone), I guess I keep it to remember that person.

I remember when my uncles were going through my other uncle's house and they were going to throw away a set of Proto crowfoot wrenches after he died. Needless to say, I wound up with them!

On the toolboxes, I believe that Snapon is too high in price. 5k for a toolbox is steep, yes, I know it's nice.

I have a 1960 Craftsman setup, a Husky setup and a Husky/Craftsman mix (sounds like a dog..lol). I have a SnapOn hang on box that a coworker gave me---dates back to the 50's.

Believe it or not, I sold a KR series upper and lower box for my coworker. His didn't have roller drawers on the bottom---my 1960 Craftsman does!

Craftsman boxes are made by Waterloo and Husky boxes are made by Stanleyworks in Canada. I have seen Snapon boxes made there too and they look AWFULLY like Husky boxes!

 
BA-35's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

09-30-03, 02:01 PM   #12  
BA-35
OK, that's some good advice on tools, but now let me ask you about parts.

I've planning a project and am trying to put together all the parts. From other discussions on this forum, it would seem that, when it comes to parts, you get what you pay for and OEM is usually the way to go if you want quality. But where do you get OEM parts?

Take the timing belt for example. Why risk valve damage just to save $15 on a cheap belt. But how do you know which belt is the good one? The auto part websites list the item's manufactuer, but I don't recognize most of the names. I saw one made by Goodyear for $20. Goodyear is a name I'm familiar with, but $20 is about a third of the price of thether brandnames.

How do you guys pick out good parts?

 
billys68ss's Avatar
Member

Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 1,459
WV

09-30-03, 02:59 PM   #13  
We usually get the Goodyear belt. I have used OEM belts as well as the other brands, really no difference IMHO. Some will argue this, but a belt is a belt as far as I am concerned. It is only gonna last as long as it is gonna last in the environment it is placed in regardless of brand. The ONLY place to for sure get OEM parts is from the respective dealer of whatever vehicle you plan to work on.
Billy

 
mike from nj's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

09-30-03, 09:46 PM   #14  
mike from nj
i've taken new timing belts out of the factory boxes only to find 'gates' stamped right next to the name of the corporation. guess who's making that belt---not the car maker


oem=original equipment manufacturer, meaning it's mostly sold through the dealer, the place where they sell the cars too. be prepared for a huge mark-up on parts though. whenever i buy from another dealer, i'm sure to be wearing my uniform shirt and i usually get a 'wholesale' discount, big difference in price!

i haven't had any problems with goodyear belts

 
Joe_F's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

10-01-03, 03:50 AM   #15  
Joe_F
BA:

I'll keep it simple here, as this is a whole other discussion. LOL .

In short OEM parts are gotten from a dealer. If you had a GM or Ford vehicle, some OEM parts are sold through parts stores that carry Delco and Motorcraft as these guys sell the same part under two #s, and the one through the parts store is usually always cheapest.

As Mike said, very few car companies make their own stuff. I am selling a load of GM new old stock parts on Ebay shortly and looking at the GM parts, right next to the GM # is some mark of who actually made it. Fat chance of getting it from them because they are:

1) Out of business
2) Someone else now owns them
3) Bound by contract with the OEM not to sell to the public
4) If they would sell it to you, it would be in lot quantities of 1000s.LOL
5) No longer make that part

As Billy and Mike pointed out, many times you open an OEM box and walah, aftermarket company's part in the box. Hit or miss with this and being in parts for a living I can tell you it happens with everything.

I bought a Gemline cold control for my mother's fridge in 2000. GE wanted $98 for it. I got a Gemline part from a local parts distributor for $45 as this machine is very old, but works great.

Open the Gemline box: Walah, GE made control. Same thing, half the price. Happens in every industry.

Shop around and it depends on what it is. You can always just post a question and we'll share our experience with you.

On a timing belt job? I'd go OEM parts. Not something you want to do twice !

 
BA-35's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

10-02-03, 01:05 PM   #16  
BA-35
Thanks guys, I'll let you know how it turns out.

 
Search this Thread