towing

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  #1  
Old 10-12-03, 03:34 PM
larryc
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towing

Will it hurt to tow a 66 nova with a 700R4 automatic transmission and stock rear end on a 2 wheel dolly with rear wheels on ground 600 miles on interstates?
 
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  #2  
Old 10-12-03, 03:45 PM
mike from nj
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tow it backwards, front wheels on the ground and the steering wheel mechanically locked, or take the driveshaft out and plug the trans.

when the engine is idling, it is turning the front pump of the transmission, which is providing lubrication for the trans internals. towing it with the wheels spinning, is also spinning all the gears inside without lubrication, think how long an engine lasts without oil(similiar but not exactly the same circumstance). you can tow it safely for a short distance, but definitely not 600 miles.

when we get big trucks (diesels) towed into our shop, every single one has the driveshaft removed by the tow truck driver. the rare one that doesn't, will need an (automatic) trans very quickly!

there should be a 'tow guy' posting here shortly with some very good advice.
 
  #3  
Old 10-12-03, 03:55 PM
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Location: North Texas
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NO

NO don't do it transmission will be damaged. Here is what I would do and have done when I towed my 84 chevelle from California to Texas. I towed with a tow bar all four wheels on ground. I removed drive shaft unhooked battery and turned key to the unlock position.
Got here no problem put back drive shaft topped of trannie fluid and hooked up battery and off I went.
I used external lights that I hooked up to the truck trailer harness.
 
  #4  
Old 10-12-03, 03:58 PM
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and by the way

And by the way a 66 nova is a fine car would hate for you to ruin the trannie,is it an SS?
 
  #5  
Old 10-12-03, 05:57 PM
Joe_F
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No! As stated, you can lunch the tranny that way. The front wheels should do the rolling as the bearings are lubed and will roll with the flow. Best way is a flatbed of course.

Michael: '84 Chevelle? No such thing '74, '64?
 
  #6  
Old 10-12-03, 06:18 PM
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86 chev

Thats right Joe it was a 76 Chevelle with square headlights and opera windows a good old car kinda a boat.
 
  #7  
Old 10-13-03, 05:29 AM
larryc
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thanks all for your help. Looks like you might have saved me from replacing tranny!!!!!!!!! I think flatbed best way to go. Thanks Again.

Not a SS, just a modified 2 dr sedan
 
  #8  
Old 10-13-03, 06:03 AM
Joe_F
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Thumbs up

Still a nice old bowtie. Keep it going.
 
  #9  
Old 10-14-03, 04:57 AM
the_tow_guy's Avatar
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Been a little busy lately with a woodworking project.

All good advice. The only time we tow stuff with drive wheels on the ground is when we either drop the driveshaft or the vehicle is capable of running (flat tire on the non-drive end, no spare, short haul to tire shop). There ARE allowable limits for towing vehicles on their drive wheels depending on the make, but even then you're looking at something like not over 35 mph and not over 50 miles TOTAL over the LIFE of the car. Older cars are generally more forgiving because the trannies are not designed quite the same, but for 600 miles you definitely would not want to be spinning the tranny.

If you already have the dolly available, I would opt for just dropping the shaft. Choosing between a dolly or a car trailer, take the trailer obviously.

Always amazing to see people tow-roping vehicles to save a $36 tow charge; their tranny repair will be a LOT more.

Additional FYI: Generally people figure manual transmissions are safe to tow any speed/distance as long as they are in neutral. As I understand it this is no longer the case on some newer vehicles due to redesigning. Becasue of this we avoid towing manual trans cars on the drive wheels as well. When in doubt, check your owner's manual or other source of information.

Note on "flatbeds": Some vehicle manufacturers have used "flatbed" as meaning "don't use a traditional sling-type wrecker". Lots of people think their car "HAS TO HAVE A FLATBED!!!!!" when they can be safely towed by OEM-approved wheel lift equipment.
 
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