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replacing front brake pads


impappadude's Avatar
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10-18-03, 04:22 PM   #1  
replacing front brake pads

I am replacing the front brake pads on a 2000 Chevy Cavalier.
The old pads are off and new ready to go on.

I however do not have enough clearance with the new pads to fit around the rotor because I cannot get the piston to retract back into the caliper far enough. I was told to use a C clamp to apply pressure enough to gain the needed clearance. It won't budge. I have removed most of the brake fluid from the fluid holding tank but obviously am still missing something.

What do I need to do to get the piston to move?

 
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Joe_F's Avatar
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10-18-03, 06:36 PM   #2  
Joe_F
Put an old pad back in and use a large C clamp to compress it evenly back in. Should work.

If not, Autzone can rent you the proper tool and you can use a 1/2" drive rachet to drive in the piston.

Barring that, caliper is wiped/piston stuck/seized.

 
impappadude's Avatar
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10-18-03, 08:06 PM   #3  
Thanks. I will give it a try.

 
Desi501's Avatar
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10-19-03, 06:56 AM   #4  
Are both sides going back an equal amount? If you were able to retract the calipers at all, they'll usually go all the way. Occasionally you'll get a bad set of pads that may be boxed incorrectly.
Just another possibility.

 
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10-19-03, 07:11 AM   #5  
darrell McCoy
Did a 2000 have the "threaded" pistons. Have to turn then instead of just compressing them. I remember that 95 olds had those type calipers??? Like I sez, I am not sure.

 
JungleJim's Avatar
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CANADA

10-22-03, 08:18 PM   #6  
I have a 2000 cav. and the pistons are the regular squeeze in type. They should retract without a whole lot of effort.

 
bigguy05641's Avatar
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10-23-03, 08:33 AM   #7  
yeah those pistons should push back in without alot of effort. Look at the boot around the piston and see if there are any tears, which would indicate moisture has gotten in there and rusted it. IF a clamp doesn't move it, you have a problem.
IF you decide u have aproblem, before replacing that caliper, try loosening the bleeder screw and then try to press the piston back in. If it moves now, you have a hydraulic restriction elsewhere. If it still won't move, replace the caliper.

 
Desi501's Avatar
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10-23-03, 06:29 PM   #8  
Originally posted by darrell McCoy
Did a 2000 have the "threaded" pistons. Have to turn then instead of just compressing them. I remember that 95 olds had those type calipers??? Like I sez, I am not sure.
Never on the front.




bigguy05641

Right on

 
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