Tools

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  #1  
Old 10-30-03, 12:30 PM
jabari
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Tools

I am looking for a tool set that is going to be used everyday. I was wondering what you guys considered the best out there. Also is there anything comparable to the MT2550 Scanner that Snap On makes. I am looking for a scanner that is cheaper.
 
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  #2  
Old 10-30-03, 01:12 PM
Joe_F
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If you're in the trade, go for the best stuff you can afford (SnapOn, Matco, etc)

For home use, Craftsman is fine. You can get a virtually complete tool set including toolbox from Sears for about 1000 bones in their catalog.
 
  #3  
Old 10-30-03, 03:39 PM
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Quality stuff

Snap-On if you are a serious Tech big money.Sears has some nice stuff now at a great price.
Sears is good for the home mechanic and they have a good warranty.Proto ,Mac are also good.Just dont buy the tools at the discount bin from Wal-Mart.Those are tools you modify a one time deal.
 
  #4  
Old 10-30-03, 03:55 PM
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Every scanner has it's own niche. Tech II or Mastertech are for GM specialists. OTC is cheap but inadequit. Snap on is the easiest to use and the most universal but doesn't do everything. There's another popular one out there but the name is escaping me right now. That one's equilivently priced with snap-on but i still like the snap on better. The softwares not cheap though. Domestics are about $500 without troubleshooter and import pkg is about $1200 last time I checked.
 
  #5  
Old 10-30-03, 03:56 PM
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Jabari, you can pick up used snap on tools on ebay for reasonable money. There's nothing like the feel of a good snap on tool.
 
  #6  
Old 10-31-03, 03:18 PM
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The OTC Genesys is the only scan tool that I've seen that can do GM SPS programming other than a Tech 2,current year updates are no charge from the OTC website for registered owners.A freind let me use it and it beats the snap on scanner.It ain't cheap though,but neither is snap on.Use caution buying a scan tool on ebay.I've seen Matco scanners on there cheap with cut cords.Stolen tech 2 scanners have been found through ebay.If you were to buy the Matco you will not be able to buy a cord.I worked for them awhile and thats what they do to rejects after recording the serial number.If you get a tech 2 and it's stolen you can never get it repaired.Vetronix uses serial numbers for id also.I would consider a low price scanner or code reader if you are not doing it full time in your own business.Same with handtools,take a look at Craftsman Professional,if they had them when tools made me poor that's what I would have bought.I know you were considering becoming a technician on a previous post so consider that I've spent about 45,000 on tools to date.Close to 2000 bucks a year and climbing.You starting now will likely need at least double that amount.
 
  #7  
Old 11-02-03, 06:16 AM
Joe_F
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Make sure whatever you buy is well supported and upgradeable . Otherwise, you'll be holding dead wood. LOL.

Davo: I'd agree with Craftsman Professional for the most part (depends), but some of the Craftsman regular stuff is fine for professionals and homeowners alike.

I only choose made in USA Craftsman stuff (most is), and I like the older versions of the stuff (it was forged). I don't think I know a single person that doesn't have SOME Craftsman in their tool collection. LOL. I've never had a problem with anything of theirs.

I remember back in '88 when a Snap On guy stopped at my neighbor's garage (he was working out of his mother's house at the time) and the guy tried to give my neighbor the pitch.

He showed me a catalog for a toolbox and when I asked him how much he said, "$3,500" with a kinda haughty sound.

I pointed to my shiny 1982 Oldsmobile Toronado and said,

"That has AM/FM cassette, power steering, brakes, windows, seats, door locks, A/C, etc, etc, etc, etc, etc, seats five people, rides like a dream and can take me across the country" And it cost me 3000 bucks, so I'm 500 ahead of the game versus your toolbox and it's a living room on wheels".

What can your toolbox do for me that a Craftsman can't? Couldn't answer that. And, I have seen a lot of Snap On boxes coming from Canada that look a lot like Husky boxes from Home Depot....hmmmm.

The only SnapOn I own is used stuff . I remember the Snap On guy used to look at the tool and say it was abused. Might be the reason why Craftsman outsells Snap on probably two to one . The warranty is unbeatable with Sears.

There IS a difference, the question is whether it's worth it to you or not....I've yet to see the SnapOn prove itself for me.
 
  #8  
Old 11-02-03, 07:23 AM
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you should look at craftsman professional wrenches as they are a decent wrench and alot cheaper than mac or snap-on wrench sets, however most of your other tools such as ratchets, sockets, extensions should be of better quality and is worth buying snap-on or mac.
 
  #9  
Old 11-02-03, 08:14 AM
Joe_F
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MAC is owned by K-D Danaher who makes....

Craftsman's hand tools .

Some time ago I found a box of tools out for trash on a nightly walk and there was a MAC screwdriver in the lot. I sent it back to MAC and I'll be danged if it didn't look like the same screwdriver I got from Home Depot as an exchange for some Stanley units I brought back there.

HD used to have a competitive tool swap program. At first it was SnapOn and Craftsman for Husky, but I used to be able to swap anything (just about). They dropped that program.

Most of my tools are Sears Craftsman. Be careful and don't buy Companion, that is the cheaper imported knockoff and DOESN'T have a warranty like the Craftsman does .
 
  #10  
Old 11-02-03, 10:00 AM
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Joe are you sure Danaher owns Mac Tools?If they do that makes 2 travelling tool companies,I worked for Matco Tools for awhile and knew they owned Matco and KD.Danaher is a fairly young company compared to alot of others,but they don't take prisoners lol,they are out to win so to speak.
 
  #11  
Old 11-02-03, 11:34 AM
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actually from what ive read stanley owns mac tools and danaher owns matco although stanley did make some craftsman tools in previous years but now danaher does.
http://www.bricklin.org/TechCentral/...leWhotools.htm
 
  #12  
Old 11-03-03, 05:58 AM
Joe_F
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Yes, I had it backward . Interesting article, I have seen it before....

Point of all this: Sears is one company that is putting good quality stuff at the reach of the homeowner, professional or entry level tech.

Some pros scorn Craftsman, but 99% of them own a piece or two (or 100. LOL). I'm sure SnapOn would love their volume sales .

I was at a U-pull it yard in PA this weekend and I'd say 95% of the toolboxes and tools were Craftsman, including the three drawer unit of my coworker's and me sporting my late dad's 1979 grey Waterloo made tote box.

You look at these things while waiting on line to pay or get in. LOL.
 
  #13  
Old 11-03-03, 07:32 AM
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Didn't mean to sound like a prima donna, I have boxes full of craftsmen tools and no doubt about it they get the job done. I don't work on cars every day but over the years I've collected snap on hand tools and if I were working on cars every day I would only use them. The diffrence is sort of like sleeping with 100% humidity on cotton sheets or polyester sheets.
When one works with tools every day buy the best you can. I also would not buy them new.
 
  #14  
Old 11-03-03, 10:13 AM
Joe_F
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That's true. Snapon tools USED fetch a good price except when you really need the money. I've bought nothing new from Snapon, it's either been given to me, found, or I got it at a yard sale for a buck or two. LOL.

I also think SnapOn's return policy is a little hokey. I picked up a Snapon CTC4 circuit tester and I wanted it warrantied or freshened up.

Snapon told me to contact Waekon (who must make it for them). Wakeon says send it in, not sure if it's warrantied, I have to ask Snapon. Snapon says contact a dealer.

If I were buying Snapon in the thousands, I would tell them to take all their crap back. LOL. They should just give me an RGA and tell me to send it in.

I told them: Bottom line: If this were a Craftsman, I'd own a new one already. LOL .
 
  #15  
Old 11-03-03, 02:27 PM
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Tools my 5 cents

I use my tools everyday since I repair aircraft for an airline for a living. My box consists of mostly Snap-On but I do have quite a few Craftsman.
I find that Snap-On has tools more fitting for the type work I do.
Thinner ratchets, smaller walled sockets, ratchets were the click is more closely spaced and a few other things.
Nothing against Craftsman they also have some good tools I just bought some ratchet wrenches and I use them everyday.
When I was in the Military as a jet mechanic they bought only Snap-On.
American Airlines buys only Snap-On for check out tools such as Torque wrenches and super large sockets for torqueng engine bolts.
 
  #16  
Old 11-03-03, 04:14 PM
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I use my tools every day. I have a Snap-On tool box that I bought as a trade in. It looked brand new when I bought it, not a scratch on it. It is still in pretty much the same condition. I still paid well over $3000 for it. All of my hand tools, with the exception of one 3/8 ratchet, a set of wobble extensions and a torgue wrench (all Snap-On), are Craftsman. For general automotive repair I can not see any reason to pay the inflated price for a set of wrenches from Snap-On. I buy from the 3 tool trucks that frequent my shop, Snap-On, MAC, and Cornwell. I normally only buy things on the tool trucks that I can not get at Sears, mostly specialty tools. I have bought all types of tools on Ebay as well, new and used. Be careful if you plan to do this. Be sure you are really getting a good deal as some of the ebay folks think their stuff is made of gold. Im not paying more for something used than I can get it for new on the truck.
As for a scanner, there are lots of different scanners out there. We have an OTC Genysis at the shop as well as an older OTC Monitor 4000. I have a OTC Monitor 4000 Enhanced. The Genisys has its moments. There are some cars that it will not communicate with and the software is missing information on some cars. I have never used a Snap-On scanner but from what I hear they are very good, versatile scanners. I may break down and buy one in the future.

Bottom line is....... What you buy really depends on what path you choose. If you are going to work at a dealership or an independent garage, or work at home or start your own repair business. You have to have tools that are going to last. Always buy tools that are guaranteed and you will not go wrong
Hope this is helpful to ya,
Billy
 
  #17  
Old 11-04-03, 01:22 AM
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Are you working for a dealer? When I started at the dodge dealer in my town, I picked up a snap-on scanner and programs for dodge, ford and chevy as well. This gave me an advantage. The dealer scan tools did not work on anything other than dodge, and nobody else there had a scanner for other makes. That meant I got some work that I might not have otherwise if I didn't have the scanner. (on slow days, they try to spread the work out among the techs, but when a make other than dodge came in with the check engine light on, it was almost sure to go in my bay).

I have many brands of tools. Most of my sockets are craftsman and SK. I have some mac and snap-on and proto as well. The craftsmans seem to compare well with the others, and they are much cheaper and easier to get warrantied. I have two toolchests...one is snap-on (large bottom box with drawers in front, on side, and cabinets in the back with a large top box with flip over lid that covers the drawers). The other is Homak, which I was told made the craftsman boxes at the time. The homak is a good box. I don't know if they are still made. It's not near as big, and the finish fades, but it is decent for the money.

Most any hand tools and tool boxes by craftsman are good quality. I'm not real fond of their air tools though. For a good air tool without the snap-on prices, look at CP (central pneumatic). Ingersoll-Rand is another, but usually more pricey. I believe ingersoll makes most of the mac air tools, and CP makes many of the snap-on air tools.
 
  #18  
Old 11-04-03, 03:31 AM
Joe_F
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Sears toolboxes are made by Waterloo Industries and pretty much always have been. If the sticker is still in the top drawer of the box, it will say "Sears model #706.xxxxxx".

My 1960, 1968, and 1992 boxes of Sears are all Waterloo.

706 is the vendor code for Waterloo Industries.

Sears air tools are CP, some are IR (Professional line, I believe). I also believe Florida Pneumatic is making lot of the air tools for Sears, IR and HD. FP is hooked in with Fuji of Japan and makes a good product.

HD warranties their air tools for life, so I went with them over Sears or a truck. I did find a $369 Snap on air rachet laying in the street one day and I rebuilt it for 40 cents in O-rings, some time and cleaning. It even had a 9/16" Craftsman socket on it which was returned. LOL.

I just brought back a 1/2" drive rachet handle to Sears last night that I paid $1 (or less) at a yard sale. Sears gives you a refurbished tool now (that's OK), but they don't question you. This is their great advantage and what makes them so attractive.
 
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