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1993 F150 fuel tank removal


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11-01-03, 01:47 PM   #1  
1993 F150 fuel tank removal

Removing the rear tank to replace the fuel pump is a monster. I hope the front tank is easier to remove.

 
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11-01-03, 02:39 PM   #2  
I love surprises. The clips that hold the fuel lines to the connectors to the pump are not anything like the ones in the manual and are unlike what I have to replace them. I had bought every clip and seal and o-ring before I started so I could replace them all.

Of course, you have to be an octopus to be able to disconnect them. Still working on that.

 
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11-02-03, 05:33 AM   #3  
Joe_F
Fords mostly use Duckbill type clips on their fuel lines from I remember. A good auto parts store should have the disconnect tool you need---ask 'em.

As for the fuel pump, a couple of options:

1) The OEM sells you the whole fuel module/sender. It is specific to the tank placement (midship, fore/aft axle, etc) and tank size/wheelbase of the vehicle.

2) The aftermarket sells the Walbro OEM snap on module/pump. You would reuse the wire hanger/sender.

Probably about half the price. The Walbro part is the OEM pump in this year.

Ya, these can be a pain. Another "Quality Ain't Job 1" idea by the Blue Oval folks

 
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11-02-03, 06:34 AM   #4  
Chris:

I'm not sure if this would be your cup of tea or be as easy on a Ford, but when working on my latest project, an '88 3/4 ton Dodge 4x4, I found it much easier to remove the 8 bolts and 2 wire connectors and slide the box off. I'm now able to stand up and look down on the pump.
BTW, it took 15 minutes to remove the bolts and connectors and ten minutes to lift the box off with an engine lift.


GregH.........HVAC/R Tech

 
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11-02-03, 08:00 AM   #5  
I researching the hundreds of pages on this topic, I found a recommendation for the very thing you mentioned. The poster said he pulled the bed and was looking down on the pumps and tanks. I could have kicked myself for not knowing that.


Now that the tank is halfway out and I am still faced with the mystery connectors........

I already understand why it costs $500 to have a pump changed on this truck.

 
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11-02-03, 08:36 AM   #6  
Chris:

I have removed pick-up boxes before but never to work on a gas tank.
I had to work on the fuel pump but first removed the box to clean-up and paint the frame.
Working on the fuel tank, re-doing the rear brakes, parking brake cables and shocks are a big bonus. I can also tighten up the exhaust system without getting dirt in my eyes.

After applying Never-Seize to the 8 bolts that fasten the box, next time I will have it off in the same time that it takes to remove two wheels.


GregH.........HVAC/R Tech

 
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11-02-03, 11:37 AM   #7  
mike from nj
i've seen this too, just get three other strong people to walk the bed right off the back. it makes life a bit easier. i've also seen people take one side's bolts out and loosen the other side and just prop up the one side of the bed to work on the top of the gas tank, seems a bit dangerous to me though, i would just take the whole thing off.

 
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11-02-03, 12:58 PM   #8  
It makes me shudder to think of someone under a half removed box with who knows what holding it up.

A pick-up box isn't too hard to move.
I made a little attachment for my engine hoist to safely and easily remove the box by myself and my son and I were able to maneuver a box from an 80's GM without too much trouble.


GregH.........HVAC/R Tech

 
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11-02-03, 01:48 PM   #9  
Well, it doesn't matter. I cannot get the connectors apart anyway. I am trying to put it back together now.

I think that pulling the bed is a marveous idea. If I try this again, I will have to look into using a hoist. I guess I would need to rig up a sling of some sort to remove the bed.

I still won't be able to get the connectors apart, but the work will be easier to see. The writer of the manual who wrote to slide the connector back and forth then insert to tool to release the clip has never done it. It does not work that way.

This has turned out to be a disaster. I still have to have the pump replaced before the front one fails, too.

Bummer.

 
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11-03-03, 07:32 PM   #10  
chfite, I work at FORD DEALER and we all take the bed off to replace FUEL PUMPS on TRUCKS. Alot faster and cleaner job!

Fix it right the first Time.

 
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11-04-03, 01:39 PM   #11  
I had another mechanic tell me that he always pulls the bed, there was no sense in doing anything else. I guess the writers of the manual don't know that to mention it. I am getting geared up to pull the bed and do this the smart way.

 
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11-05-03, 05:29 PM   #12  
Wound up having to go have someone break the bed retaining bolts loose with an impact wrench. Tomorrow I will get to the DIY part. If I can get the connectors off. Push, push, twist.

 
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11-07-03, 06:35 AM   #13  
I changed the fuel filter. It has the same connectors as the fuel pump has. When I push, push, and twist, it disconnects. Now that works. The fuel filter holds an incredible amount of gasoline. I'm glad I didn't wind up wearing it.

Now, on to lifting the bed and changing the fuel pump.

 
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11-07-03, 06:43 AM   #14  
Joe_F
You've got the right idea, Chris.

Check out what I said a few posts up about the OEM pump being sold in the aftermarket. Make sure you use an OEM Walbro pump no matter where you get it.

I can tell you how to determine if you are getting an OEM pump if you give me some #s from the instruction sheets or tag #s stamped on your new part (if it's aftermarket).

Case in point: Chrysler wanted $250 for the fuel pump unit for my friend's 1991 Dodge Shadow.

I got an aftermarket pump which was the same Walbro OEM unit in the box for $125 wholesale out the door. In stock at my regular parts store that's been there since 1920.

 
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11-08-03, 08:39 PM   #15  
Got the Walbro.

Every step of the process had its problems. After raising the bed, I had to wrestle with the connectors. Eventually, they released as they were supposed to. Trying to keep the O-ring in place while inserting and mounting the pump was a nuisance.

It is finally complete. The most essential thing about this was raising the bed to get to the tanks on this truck.

I appreciate the help that I received here.

 
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11-09-03, 01:17 PM   #16  
Joe_F
Good job, Chris.

 
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