Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

Denso and NGK Iridium spark plugs.


Changeling's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 405

11-05-03, 03:30 PM   #1  
Denso and NGK Iridium spark plugs.

I am at the point that I need a new set of plugs before winter. I have been reading about the new iridium plugs from the "above" companies. They claim increased power, gas mileage, etc.
Are these claims true? If you get increased gas mileage, at what level? For instance will the new plug design pay for itself in "X" number of miles or what? I am talking about the top of the line plugs here! For instance in DENSO the IK16, and the NGK ifr5J11.
Where does the hype stop, and reality begin?
Changeling

 
Sponsored Links
bejay's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 2,538

11-05-03, 04:59 PM   #2  
if the car is over due for being tuned up then all those claims are likely to be true regardless of what brand plug you put in, if its not due for a tune up you will likely not notice any difference in performance or gas mileage just by switching to a different plug.

 
billys68ss's Avatar
Member

Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 1,459
WV

11-05-03, 06:15 PM   #3  
What kind of car??? I'm betting a Toyota!!! I have seen where the NGK Iridium plugs are good for over 80k miles. My in-laws have a 2002 Toyota Camry and when I did their 30k service in Alldata it did not say to replace the plugs till 100k. I dont believe in this service interval, but when we called up to see about getting the plugs the aftermarket supplier said that they were not abailable yet. So we didnt do them. Im thinking they should be due by 60k.
Billy

 
darrell McCoy's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

11-05-03, 06:28 PM   #4  
darrell McCoy
Unless there has been an upgrade posted, I am a firm believer in using what ever the manufacture recommends.

 
mike from nj's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

11-05-03, 10:02 PM   #5  
mike from nj
the factory engineers spent a sick amount of money figuring out the best plug for any engine. if a commercial comes along and claims to have a better product, then they're doing their job correctly, and that is promoting their stuff over what the factory recommends to try to make a buck. don't waste your money on any modern day split-fire wanna-be. the factory recommended plug is the only thing to buy unless a bulletin was issued by the manufacturer for an improved one.

you can use whatever plug you want, but it likely won't be any better.

 
billys68ss's Avatar
Member

Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 1,459
WV

11-06-03, 04:09 AM   #6  
I agree with Mike. The shop where I work stocks a variety of Bosch plugs because they got em cheap. I have heard alot of varied stories over the years about what plugs are good and what plugs are bad. As Mike said the mfg. uses a specific plug because it works best in their engines. Some cars will not run well with just any plug. The guys at me shop want to use the Bosch plugs in everything. I say NO WAY!!! I have seen it first hand. I try to get Delco plugs any time I am working on a GM, Denso's on Asian cars, and Motorcraft on Fords. I personally dont like the Bosch plugs, never have. I put Bosch plugs in my wifes 96 Nissan and it does ok, but next time im going back with Denso's.
Billy

 
michael van's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 2,345
TX

11-06-03, 05:15 AM   #7  
PLUGS

I would go with what the car manafacture says,My new Toyota has the new Iridum plugs they say 100 thousand miles before change,
I dont know about that .I will check them way before then I only have 20 thousand now so I know they are still good.But when time comes to replace them I will use the Iridum just like what came with it.

 
fordguy's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

11-06-03, 05:44 AM   #8  
fordguy
The denso, or ngk iridium plugs will give more power ect. but in a normal daily driver i'd just go with a cheaper plug and save some dough!!

 
Joe_F's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

11-06-03, 06:36 AM   #9  
Joe_F
All of my cars run the stock $1.63 Delco spark plug as what came in them in 1979, 1980, 1982, 1984, 1989 and 1993 respectively.

Anything other than the stock plug is a complete waste of money. It either sparks or it doesn't to keep it short and sweet.

Splitfire among others has really never been able to substantiate their claim(s) with hard facts.

Whatever the owner's manual says, use that brand and part #. End of story.

 
Changeling's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 405

11-06-03, 11:53 AM   #10  
Interesting replies. The plugs mentioned are the ones that the Manufacture recommends, except for the NGK which is a "cross reference plug". I am trying very hard to understand some of the comments actually. A plug is a very simple item that doesn't require a rocket scientist to develop. Once you have the heat range most other things are a plus are minus on the "spark" duration/size/intensity. My reason for asking about the two plugs is that DENSO uses an Iridium center electrode (Their design) and a regular metal ground (There design).
NGK uses an Iridium center electrode and a "Platinum" tip on the Ground, which are both their design. The different designs allow for a different spark relative to size/duration/intensity.
I was wondering if there has been enough time on both plugs to see some inherent advantage between the two designs?
Changeling

 
Joe_F's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

11-06-03, 12:15 PM   #11  
Joe_F
None. Spark plugs are spark plugs for the same given application, that's the bottom line.

An AC Delco RapidFire in a 1980 Trans Am like I have won't do a dang thing but drain my wallet.

Each manufacturer chooses a plug that's a combination of all the attributes they want for the engine.

Bottom line: If you pay more than the OEM list price for an aftermarket plug, you're wasting your money---the OEM plug will do the job for less money (and do it better).

 
Changeling's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 405

11-06-03, 02:42 PM   #12  
Hi Joe, I called Toyota to see if I could get the straight "Savvy" on the plug situation, This is what I was basically told:
The new iridium and Platinum plugs are a must for computer monitored systems/engines for the following reasons:
The computer driven control of the engine establishes it's condition/monitoring of the system through extreme recurrence of every condition that influences the combustion and characteristics change in the combustion firing order. This requires a firing (plug) that will deliver an extremely long wear factor due to the "Multiple cycles" the computer uses to establish a base line to make adjustments! Bottom "Less wear less tear", makes sense to me!
I ordered a set of 6 DENSO Ik16's for the V6 Tacoma about 10 minutes ago. What they say make sense!
Joe the above words are mine.
Changeling

 
raharold's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 177

11-06-03, 07:14 PM   #13  
Put simply: Platinum and Iridium last longer and are more reliable than copper. Copper is a better conductor but degrades quicker. A lot of performance gearheads use copper plugs but have to change them constantly because they wear down much faster. FWIW, my car, a small displacement, high boost, turbo charged car runs better on NGK Platinum (stock) than Denso Iridium...go figure.

Ross

 
Joe_F's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

11-07-03, 07:07 AM   #14  
Joe_F
Chang:

Exactly. Apparently the Iridium is the OEM plug . Hence it was what the OEM wanted originally.

Bottom line: The source (Toyota who made the vehicle) knows what belongs in there to deliver good performance. I have no reason to doubt what they say.

Which is what I said originally. LOL

Ross: I agree with your assessment, but if you've ever run Champions in a GM car, you'll know the Delcos are a mile ahead.

Remember: Champion is not the OEM on a GM for instance. They will consolidate heat range values where GM says they are different part #s. That is why a GM car runs best with OEM stock plugs.

Same thing for your vehicle. Stick with the OEM plug .

If I had a buck for every person that thinks high dollar spark plugs will make a vehicle run better, I'd be retired. LOL.

 
billys68ss's Avatar
Member

Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 1,459
WV

11-07-03, 09:49 AM   #15  
I've got a good one for you all on spark plugs. I have had a bear in the shop for awhile. It is a 2000 Hyundai Elantra 2.0. It came in with a check engine light on and a P0304 code stored. Cylinder 4 misfire. To make this somewhat short, I checked EVERYTHING and determined that the coil assembly must be bad. I got the coil assy. in today and installed and whalla no more misfire. My manager said, why dont we go ahead and install new plugs. I told him ok, the car has 114k miles so lets go ahead and do plugs and wires as the original wires were still installed. So he goes to order the stuff and comes back and tells me that he ordered the OE spark plugs for the car and then proceeds to tell me that he ordered Autolite plugs. Im like HUH???? I wanted to laugh, but i just told him that Autolites are not the OE plugs and that they are not OE in ANYTHING!!!! PERIOD!!! He just walked off in a huff. They are still stuck on the cheap thing. If it is cheap it will work is their philosophy. I cant beat it into their heads that the correct plug is the only way to go.
Thought some of you might get a laugh out of this one!
Billy

 
Joe_F's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

11-07-03, 10:00 AM   #16  
Joe_F
Autolites may have been OEM in some old Ford or AMC you had in the 60's, but things have come a long way since those days.

You'll spend a more money on the "better" plugs when the "right" plug will do for less money. LOL .

 
Changeling's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 405

11-07-03, 10:43 AM   #17  
Joe I checked the page for problems with my vehicle and there were notices concerning my truck. Is the dealer supposed to fix those problems defined by the factory if I take the truck in?
Changeling

 
Joe_F's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

11-07-03, 11:29 AM   #18  
Joe_F
If they are recalls, yes if they apply to your vehicle. Call a dealer with your VIN # and they will tell you what to do and if it needs doing.

If they are TSB's, it "depends". If there isn't a problem, nothing to really worry about. If you do have a problem, the bulletin will help fix it. Not all cars are affected by bulletins either.

 
Search this Thread