97 Nissan PU 4x4 O2 sensor removal?

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  #1  
Old 11-25-03, 11:07 PM
mralphe
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97 Nissan PU 4x4 O2 sensor removal?

I am having alot of trouble removing my O2 sensor from the exhaust manifold. I have the right kind of socket, but I'm breaking wrenches and stripping the bolt. Does anyone have any good tips or tricks for doing this. I'd hate to have to take it into the shop. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. ,Matt
 
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Old 11-26-03, 02:37 AM
Join Date: Jun 2002
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Sometimes they are very tuff. Heat of a torch usually will loosen it
 
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Old 11-26-03, 04:08 AM
billys68ss's Avatar
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If it not too tight of a location a 22mm (or 7/8) wrench will do the trick. But if you are "Breaking wrenches" then you definately have a problem. Spray some penetrating oil on it and let it sit for awhile. That usually helps a great deal. Be sure to put anti sieze on the threads if the new sensor doesnt come with it.
Billy
 
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Old 11-27-03, 03:49 PM
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Sounds crazy, but if a torch isn't handy, sometimes just running the engine for a while will loosen it.. Of course makes it easier to get burned, so use care!
 
  #5  
Old 11-27-03, 09:20 PM
mike from nj
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i would think heat from a running engine would heat both the manifold and the sensor equally.

what works for me is to heat the manifold (or pipe) very quickly with a torch, until it's glowing, and at the same time, avoid heating the sensor. this expands the exhaust off of the sensor ever so slightly, giving you the advantage.

be carefull, when it resorts to this (the torch) it's a 50/50 shot of the threads of the manifold coming out with the sensor. be prepared to use a 'tap' to clean up the threads or you will ruin the new sensor by the second turn of the wrench. then you will still need to chase the threads and another sensor.

or you could get lucky, and the grip on the sensor will be lessened enough so the sensor will just 'pop' loose.

do you feel lucky?
 
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Old 11-28-03, 05:19 PM
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I agree with you Mike..Running the engine does heat both the exhaust and sensor.. So why does it work? Got me! LOL! It just does..The only thing I figure is different types of metals, heating in varying degrees...?
And as I said..It's a last measure, when no torch is available...
 
  #7  
Old 11-28-03, 06:51 PM
mike from nj
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hey msargent--i guess i'll have to add that one to my list of my 'poor man's tools'

a sheet of cardboard is a poor man's 'creeper'
a pipe is a poor man's breaker bar
a cinder block is a poor man's jack stand
a shirt sleeve is a poor man's rag (for checking oil)
an adjustable wrench is a poor man's socket set
another upside down battery is a poor man's jumper cables
now a running engine is a poor man's torch


ps. i have used all these tools, and often too, especially the cardboard, it's easier to move around on when you have a drop light and an air hose to get tangled in the wheels.
 
  #8  
Old 11-28-03, 08:09 PM
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The battery is a new one on me...The rest, yup.."been there, done that".. The cinder block idea can be dangerous, tho..Have to be careful doing that!!
The adjustable wrench is the easiest way I know for me to hurt myself! LOL! (besides a straight-slot screw driver!)

Good tips in extreme emergencies
 
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