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Air Condition


ucodit's Avatar
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12-19-03, 05:38 AM   #1  
ucodit
Air Condition

Hello
I have a 1990 Dodge van and it still has the old type freon in the system, which has leaked down and no longer blowing out cold air, what all has to be changed over to use the new freon 134a?
Thanks for any Info.

 
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12-19-03, 02:44 PM   #2  
You have to remove all of the oil from the system and replace it with R134 compatable oil. Recharge the system to 80% of original capacity. Sometime you have to add an extra condensor fan and the fittings have to be changed..

I would add that I do not recommend doing this. I have a lot of background in A/C repairs and in my opinion this is a bad move. R134 is great when it is used in a system that was engineered for it. The use different compressors for the higher pressures. The condensers are larger, the evaporators are designed differently and they use barrier hose. Most of the time R12 will get much colder that R134 when used in an R12 system. you would be much better off the repair the leak and continue to use R12. Retrofits will sometimes work but for the most part create problems and shorten the life of the compressor.

 
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12-19-03, 02:55 PM   #3  
I agree with desi. You still need to find and fix the leak.R134a will leak out faster than R-12 also.

 
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12-19-03, 04:41 PM   #4  
Yes R134a will tend to leak faster but never the less. Retrofitting will be the most cost effective way to do it. I would suggest a retrofit and install UV Dye tracer, and find the leak. Pumping a pound of r-12 into the atmosphere is harmful to our environment and a big waste of money.

 
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12-19-03, 10:39 PM   #5  
Considering most shops around here are charging $80.00 a pound for R12 and $40.00 per pound for R134a Yes it is cost effective to retrofit. At the very least the system needs to be thoroughly flushed and the leak found and repaired as Desi and Davo stated. If you want it to be done correctly then the compressor need to be compatable with the R134a. The receiver dryer and expansion valve and any filters in the system should be replaced prior to the retrofit. And of course the fittings have to be updated unless you replace your lines with the correct lines compatable with R134a. Which I strongly recommend.
According to the government R12 is going to be obsolete by the year 2006 so we arent going to have much choice with the retrofits if they have their way.
Billy

 
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12-20-03, 03:35 AM   #6  
Take it from a guy that works in So Florida and sees more A/C problems than the rest of the country. RETROFITTING WILL LEAD TO PROBLEMS. The system was not engineered to run on R134 and will have problems doing it in most situations. It is impossible to remove all of the mineral oil and any that remains turns to thick gel when contacted with R134. The R12 condenser doesn't have to ability to bring the pressure down sufficiently and will lead to compressor problems and poor cooling. Nobody is going to send any R12 into the atmosphere. That's why we have recovery machines.

 
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12-20-03, 04:26 AM   #7  
This should be enough info to make your decision on how to proceed.You have opinions from both sides of the issue.Pros and cons so get in there and get your hands dirty.Have a nice day.

 
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