Fuel Rail...Whats Involved?

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  #1  
Old 01-09-04, 09:58 AM
sclarkx2
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Fuel Rail...Whats Involved?

92 Dodge Dynasty
3.3L EFI
Automatic Transmission

I just got a call from the Chrysler Dealer, and they told me the problem with my car is a leaky fuel rail (and he explained it being the thing my injectors are hooked to). Air is getting in and choking me out (and that is why I am having such a terrible time starting the vehicle when its cold).

They quoted me $700 to fix it. What really is involved to fix it myself? They mentioned things like O-rings and such. What should I buy and what should I look out for?

I've done much of my own work before, and i know the darn fuel rail is right out in front where I can get to it..at least.

All advice is welcome. I'm losing my job soon and I don't have $700.00.

-Stephen
 
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Old 01-09-04, 10:34 AM
port649
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Your best bet is to invest in a repair manual. They are available at the dealer(may be discontinued by now) or your library. Its easyer than a 3.4 cause there is no intake plenum. There are precautions to follow because you are working with fuel poss. under pressure. Read before you get started.
 
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Old 01-09-04, 11:35 AM
sclarkx2
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I have a repair manual

I have a repair manual, and I am at work, so I haven't looked at it yet. Hearing 700$ can make you upset. From calling around, I am getting an impression that the rail leaks, replace it, the associated o-rings and intake gasket.

just want some clarity
 
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Old 01-09-04, 12:07 PM
port649
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get the technician to show you whats wrong.
 
  #5  
Old 01-09-04, 12:18 PM
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I had the same problem on my old 92' Imperial. The leak is probly at one of the ends. After the sticker shock of the part itself I ended cutting the ends off and splicing it with fuel rated hose. These fuel rails are notorius leakers. As for the o-rings you may get lucky "I did" and they may not be damaged if so them dudes are not cheap either. From Crysler they were like $10.00 for 2 o-rings.
 
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Old 01-09-04, 07:31 PM
mike from nj
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sclark: your interpretation of what the dealer told you is confusing.

air is leaking in and choking out the engine----this can't happen

you can have a fuel leak, which will flood out the engine, and cause a gas smell, especially if it's leaking externally, maybe sometimes (a fuel smell) if it's leaking internally. this will cause a hard start

you can have an intake manifold gasket leak, or an injector o-ring leak, and this causes a vacuum leak into the engine, which can cause a hard start or even a rough idle.

you can have a leaky fuel pressure regulator(in the rail), which will bleed your pressure back to the tank, and cause a hard start condition

the intake plenum has to come off to replace the fuel rail, but this can be done with common hand tools, and is quite easy. the fuel rail does not have to come off to replace the intake plenum gasket (confused yet?)

let us know what you have or want to do
 
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Old 01-10-04, 01:38 AM
sclarkx2
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To Mike:

I also thought the "choking out the engine was a conflict in terms. I merely quoted the THe Chrysler dealer. I know I have a fuel pressure problem, as I could see for myself that the fuel rail was leaking gasoline from the seam as it curves around on the drivers side.

I made the original post all upset from hearing 700$. I have since inspected the vehicle, looked at the book, purchased the fuel rail and o-rings and it looks like a decent job. I have replaiced engines in my lifetime ( but with a 75 mustang).
 
  #8  
Old 01-10-04, 06:06 AM
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It was about 5 years ago when I made that repair and after posting yesterday afternoon and thinking about it last night I peeked at it and it wasn't the ends like I said earlier but it was like you said it was in the bends where it wraps around to the other rail. Good luck on your repair..In my opinion this fuel rail should have been a recall.
 
  #9  
Old 01-10-04, 06:15 PM
mike from nj
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after i get the upper intake plenum off, i stuff six rags into the intake ports, then use compressed air around the injectors to get rid of all the sand and dirt around them. 4 bolts and 2 'quick disconnects' and the rail is off. if the o-rings don't rip, they can be reused. i use a generous amount of silicone spray on the o-rings and the bosses in the lower intake manifold. this helps it go together without rolling an o-ring.

let us know how it turns out, or if you have trouble with the quick disconnects. (they also like to be clean and well lubed upon reassembly)
 
  #10  
Old 01-10-04, 07:40 PM
sclarkx2
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TY for The Input Mike

Thanks for the input Mike. I didnt' think about the rolling an o-ring issue, but the haynes manual said to put a little oil on the o-ring so that the injectors seat properly, which I did, on each o-ring (though I've heard that oil can deteriorate rubber). Everything seemed to slide in much easier than sliding out. (also when taking it apart, I noticed the o-rings on bottom of the injectors were quite hard, baked).

I'm a little discouraged, after changing the rail, because the car seemed to start even worse (and coffed bad). Makes me wonder what I did wrong.

But once the car started, the engine ran fine. I will try tomorrow to see if it starts any better.

There is something very unrelated that seems too much of a coincidence. My oil pressure gage always read on the low side once the car got warm (at first notch at starttime, then after 20 min of running, at idle, oil gage held at the low end of the box). I thought I had a lazy oil pump. After making this repair today, I went on a fairly long ride, and the oil pressure held up very well (held at the first notch at an idle after 1 hr of running, and about midway when on the road).

Did I bump something something under the hood and not realize it ???
 
  #11  
Old 01-11-04, 09:46 AM
mike from nj
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a constant oil drip would eventually deteriorate it, a little bit on installation won't hurt it.

the initial hard start is normal, you needed to get all the air purged from the rail. if it does it again, there are ways to check what's going on. did the new rail come with a regulator, if you transferred it from the old, did you also transfer both o-rings?

you shouldn't have been near the wire for the oil sender unit, it's down near the oil filter, behind the water pump. the gauge is not too accurate a reading of what's actually going on. as long as it reads "pressure" present, i wouldn't worry. just make sure it gets changed often.
 
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