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Engine Block Heater


Bob M's Avatar
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01-13-04, 10:02 PM   #1  
Engine Block Heater

Hi folks;
With this cold weather hitting the N/E I was considering installing a engine block heater in my car (dipstick, block mounted,etc.) It is parked outdoors when not in use.
I know that our brethren to the North (eh!) have them mounted in many of their cars and was interested in some information, pros and cons and recomendations.
Power hookup is not a problem, as I do have access to house power.
The car is a 1994 Toyota Corolla, 4 cylinder, 1.4liter, USA version. Also interested, for the same thing, on a 1995 Volvo 960. I know Volvo has their own, but on some things they are wayyyyyyyyyy overpriced.
I see that Whitneys has several types, but was wondering what else is out there and which of Whitneys is better for these cars.
Any help appreciated.

 
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01-13-04, 11:39 PM   #2  
mercdrive
heat

I've always liked the inline cooling system heaters
as long as you are comfortable doing it you get one for the size hose you have coming from the radiator cut out a section and clamp it in make sure it is away from fan etc etc wire tie the cord and then all you have to do is plug it in this preheats the whole system and engine reducing cold weather startups

I live in the N/E also burrrrrr

 
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01-14-04, 12:00 AM   #3  
mike from nj
i look through the jcwhitney catalog when i need a good laugh. i love their antilock brake system, that needs no wires to hook up.

if it's from a dealer, you can be assured it's going to work when you need it. not burn out after using it once, or cook the oil in the engine. what if you put the slightly wrong coolant heater in the block, and it pops out (or leaks)when you're driving---is jcwhitney going to buy you a new engine? i think not.


for the 2 times out of the year, that it actually goes below -2F, all you need is a good battery and clean terminals, maybe let it idle for a few minutes more. no car in a good state of tune will have problems starting.


my 2 cents

 
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01-14-04, 12:18 AM   #4  
mercdrive
yes jc witney has some intresting things
and no anything but softplugs shouldnt be in the block
heating the oil is ok but if your cooling system is already warm all you have to do is drive oil is already somewhat warm I really just dont like a cold car hit the romote start as im going out the door and my blazer is getting warm on the way into the garage

 
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01-14-04, 04:02 AM   #5  
Originally posted by mike from nj

for the 2 times out of the year, that it actually goes below -2F, all you need is a good battery and clean terminals, maybe let it idle for a few minutes more. no car in a good state of tune will have problems starting.
my 2 cents
I like what you said about using quality stuff but I disagree with the previous statement. There's nothing like starting a warm engine as opposed to something at 20' or less. A whole lot less wear and tear on everything from lubricated parts to starter and battery.

 
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01-14-04, 06:16 AM   #6  
In my truck, I used to use both a block heater and an inline cooling system heater. If you're going with an inline, remove it in the spring, and re-install in the winter. They corrode quickly, and life span is shortened if left in all year. IMHO

 
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01-14-04, 07:25 AM   #7  
mercdrive
YES

quaility counts dont spend to much but a cheap price is often cheap stuff Autozone sells a decent brand of heaters inline type and I think block/ dipstick types too

Jeff

 
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