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Question about gaskets...


Liquidfrequency's Avatar
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01-28-04, 12:33 AM   #1  
Liquidfrequency
Question about gaskets...

I'm a hardcore diy'er, and I thought I'd see what the pro's do with standard gaskets... ie, NOT including head gaskets, intake/exhaust, or tbi gaskets.. basically, thermostat, valve cover, etc.. your oldstyle cork gaskets (My cars are usually late 80's early early 90's models..I had an 89 mustang convertible 4banger, and now have an 88 fiero 4 banger). What can I say..I like small, red cars..

Do you use a thin coating of RTV/gasket shellac(indianhead), or do you just install dry? I've always used a thincoat of sealer on these type, and never had one leak..

I do have a funny story about my Dad..he's worked on cars all his life, and was recently putting a new headgasket on Mom's 440 Charger drag car...and he had a brainfart, and RTV'd it!! Boy, did he get a lot of ribbing on that one....

Jeanne, aka Liquidfrequency (that stuff you add when your radio has static!! ) kinda like a radiator cap for an original beetle, and ANY part for an '83 corvette....ok, I admit, bad jokes from a former Autozone manager and Advance auto parts manager...

 
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01-28-04, 04:04 AM   #2  
Situations differ. Never put anything on a cork gasket. It's designed to work dry and if you cement that to one side, I hope I'm not the tech that gets that car next time. Rubber gaskets use no sealer either. paper gaskets that seal liquids like oil or coolant can be helped with a light coat of silicone on the engine side. I usually use a spray adhesive to attach it to the component and silicone on the other side. That way it comes back off in tact and remains on the component and drastically reduces cleanup on next one. Using sealer on a gasket that wasn't designed for it can actually cause it to leak sometimes. More and more nowadays your seeing factory sealing with no gasket at all, simply silicone. It works well if done right.

 
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01-28-04, 04:21 AM   #3  
Liquidfrequency
Thanks, desi!

Guess I'll be changing the way I do cork gaskets

On another note, have you run across the felpro permanent gaskets before? Or have those been discontinued for the older cars? When I still had my mustang, (89) the thermo housing sat vertical to the engine, and it was always a mess changing the thermostat, due to any little leaning on the car caused more coolant to spill out, messing the sealing area..

Then I found the felpro gasket...it was blue somekindof plastic, with a built in red rubber type sealing area...sure made things a lot easier! I do like the rubber gaskets for mostly valve covers on the newer (lol...I guess to me anything over a '93ish is newer) cars. It sure is easier than trying to line up the old 4 piecer oilpan gaskets on the older chevy 350's!

Jeanne

 
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01-28-04, 06:21 PM   #4  
Re: Thanks, desi!

Originally posted by Liquidfrequency
Then I found the felpro gasket...it was blue somekindof plastic, with a built in red rubber type sealing area...sure made things a lot easier!
Jeanne
Yes, if your talking about the paper type with a red line ine the middle, that red line is a sealer. They are common on water pumps and T-stats. They're not really reusuable but very convenient. The biggest key to a good seal is good prep work. getting the surface perfect is the most important factor for getting a good seal. You may be referring to the newer type of hard plastic gasket with a rubber insert to seal with mostly used on GM and Ford intakes. They are a factory design for certain applications. Fel Pro is just duplicating the OE design. They have a lot of problems with those.

 
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01-28-04, 07:05 PM   #5  
I have to second what Desi said. If it doesnt have a gasket from the OE then I dont put a gasket on it.
We have had this discussion before, but its worth mentioning again here - Chrysler uses NO gasket on the trans pan, unless it is the new reusable gasket. Which is the plastic with basically an o-ring in it. Most just use RTV silicone, but its best if you use the proper (anti-foaming) type. I have seen alot of GM's with these same type re-usable gaskets, but not any Fords or other makes yet.
Billy

 
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