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Brake bleeder question


Craig_md's Avatar
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Join Date: Nov 2002
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02-05-04, 05:20 AM   #1  
Brake bleeder question

I need to flush the brake fluid on my 89 full size Blazer. I was looking on the web for something to make it easier to do. Originally looking for an air compressor powered bleeder (until I realized how expensive they were), but saw this:

Brake Bleeder

Anybody every see one of these or better yet use one? Is it worth the $60-70?

Thanks!
Craig

 
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dirty dan's Avatar
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02-05-04, 08:34 AM   #2  
Never used one, but it looks like it would work. Don't forget to push in the button on your porportioning valve while you're bleeding the rear.

 
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02-05-04, 08:45 AM   #3  
jaxle
A lot of people who do road racing use this very same product. I've heard that it works well for some, not so well for others. The problem is sometimes it does not seal well on the master cylinder. I've heard this complaint from people who use this product on their Hondas, it seals better on larger ones.

 
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02-05-04, 10:07 AM   #4  
What is the big advantage of this product? I've always had good luck with the old fashioned way. Just curious.

 
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02-05-04, 10:29 AM   #5  
jaxle
With the old fashioned way its very hard to get all the air out and it takes a long time. And you need two people.

 
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02-05-04, 11:30 AM   #6  
For me (if it works) advantages are:

1) single person
2) I need to flush and replace the brake fluid, not just bleed. I can dump a couple of quarts in and thoroughly flush the whole system
3) No need to worry about bottoming out the piston in the master cylinder

This is all assuming it works as advertised.....

Craig

 
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02-05-04, 01:59 PM   #7  
I use speed bleeders. They came with a performance brake package I purchased for my car. Work well and much simpler/cheaper than that pump thing.

 
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02-05-04, 02:50 PM   #8  
jaxle
Speed bleeders have been known to fail too after frequent use. Probably not a problem who needs to bleed their brakes only a couple times.

 
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02-05-04, 03:15 PM   #9  
How do they fail?

Not flaming just want to know...

 
davo's Avatar
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02-05-04, 03:44 PM   #10  
Open the bleeder screws and keep refilling the master until all the fluid is replaced then close the bleeders.Just leave the cap off the master while gravity bleeding.Pressure will not clean the system any better.I replace calipers and wheel cylinders without any help because I gravity bleed.Pumping the brakes moves the piston beyond normal travel and only damages the seals and you will need a new master shortly after bleeding.You can make a vacuum bleeder with a used refrigerant tank which works better than pressure in my opinion.

 
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02-05-04, 03:45 PM   #11  
I do numerous brake fluid flushes daily. That pressure unit is nothing but a headache to adapt to different master cylinder caps. It appears to use only aire to push with instead of fluid so if you don't catch it before it runs out of fluid, you have more problem that you started with. What I and many of my fellow techs use is a tool made by Mity-Vac. It is a round plastic cylinder about 2 feet tall with a plunger handle. It comes with some long plastic tube for drawing liquids of any kind from small places like dipstick tubes. They sell a brake bleeding adapter that has a shut off valve and the end slips over bleeder valve. It will continuously draw fluid at a slow enough rate not to induce air anywhere. The work great. The unit is about $60 and the bleeder adapter is about $30. You can draw any fluids from anywhere. I snap a short piece of plastic vacuum hose to the end a suck the resevoir dry before starting. They can be purchased from most tool dealers or even marine supply places. There is another unit made that hooks up to compressed air but that one sucks a little too hard and induces air in some ABS units that is very hard to get back out.

 
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